Wednesday Pre-Conference Workshops (AEJMC 2015)

8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Visit to Googleplex
$40 Fee (Participation limited to 29)
Want to get a look inside of Google? Join the Media Management & Economics Division for a site visit to Google’s global headquarters. Learn about the latest developments in YouTube, Google Search and Google Play, and how they are changing the media industry globally, nationally and locally. Lunch provided, courtesy of Google. Shuttle bus will transport to and from the hotel (fee covers shuttle costs to and from Mountain View, CA). This off-site visit is open to MMEC members only until May 1, then will be open to all AEJMC members for remaining spots. To sign-up for this exciting trip go to: https://aejmc2.wufoo.com/forms/visit-to-googleplex-mmec/. For questions, contact Louisa Ha at louisah@bgsu.edu. (MMEC)

8 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
(w1) Digital Bootcamp: The Advertising Division Pre-Conference Workshop
$50 Fee (Participation limited to 40)
The Advertising Teaching Workshop is taking advantage of the multitude of tech savvy agencies and Silicon Valley companies in the San Francisco area. They’ll be our guides as they bring us into the brave new techie world of digital content, media and analytics. These are where the jobs for our students are. These are the domains that our students should understand. The workshop will end with the sharing of ideas (for example, apps or games) that workshop participants are using in their classrooms. Come learn with us. For information, contact Sheri Broyles at Sheri.Broyles@unt.edu or 940-565-4736. (ADVD)

8 a.m. to Noon
(w2) Saving Community Journalism:  What Journalism Professors Need to Know About the Business of Local News in the Digital Age
$30 Fee (Participation limited to 40)
Many professors and journalism schools have either established news organizations or partnered with existing broadcast, print and digital outlets in their community to report on local issues or devise new ways to communicate with readers. Many of these start-up organizations are struggling to achieve scale and long-term sustainability, and many traditional outlets, such as newspapers, are struggling to make the transition to digital delivery and profits. This workshop is designed to give journalism instructors some basic economic knowledge and understanding of the business dynamics of local news organizations that they can incorporate into introductory and advanced courses. It also provides instructional digital tools and practical examples that will enable their students to go into the field and assist local for-profit and nonprofit news organizations in both creating and implementing new journalistic and business strategies. It is led by UNC’s Knight Chair in Journalism and Digital Media Economics, Penny Muse Abernathy (author of Saving Community Journalism: The Path to Profitability and of the instructional website, savingcommunityjournalism.com), and the Knight Chair in Digital Advertising and Marketing, JoAnn Sciarrino. Both have extensive professional experience, operating at the highest executive levels in international media companies, and have focused their research on developing new business models for community news organizations. For information, contact Penny Muse Abernathy at pennyma@email.unc.edu or 919-843-4910. (COMJ, Knight Foundation)

8 a.m. to Noon
Google and Data Journalism: A Match Made in Data Viz Heaven
(Pre-registration is required — Participation is limited to 30)
Join Google for a high-level overview for research stories, discovering new trends in search, finding useful data sets to support stories and understand how search works. Learn how to build custom maps with your data as well as using these tools for storytelling. The training session will feature a step-by-step guild on how to build a custom, interactive map with Maps Engine Lite/Pro and Fusion Tables. This session will also feature a deep dive on Google Earth for television and covers the best way to build a quick and easy Google Earth tour for air, movie rendering tips and Google Permissions guidelines. Participants highly encouraged to bring laptops to gain the most out of this experience.  To sign-up for the workshop go to: https://aejmc2.wufoo.com/forms/google-and-data-journalism/.  For additional information regarding this working contact Jaime Loke at jaimeloke@gmail.com (CSWN, MCSD)

8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(w3) The Media Entrepreneurship Mindset: Hacking the Ecosystem
$60 Fee (Participation limited to 100, includes breakfast and lunch)
Join us for a conversation and hackathon about building the media entrepreneurship mindset for students both inside and outside the classroom. In form and function, participants will experience the “startup culture” by working in teams to imagine new ways and places to build the entrepreneurial mindset. We’ll share models of what others are doing inside and outside the academy and then teams will develop and pitch their ideas. Participants will walk away with concrete ideas and materials for building the media entrepreneurship ecosystem at their institutions. For more information, contact Michelle Ferrier at ferrierm@ohio.edu or 740-593-9860. (PJIG, MMEC)

1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
More Than A Good Story: Methods for Teaching Digital Storytelling — (Part One)
A good story grabs attention. A good multimedia story does more than that. It uses a cohesive mix of multiple media to bring audiences into the setting, journey with the story characters, and feel a range of emotions. Can students learn how to produce these compelling stories in a semester’s timeframe? This session will examine methods for effectively instructing hands-on courses on digital storytelling. How do we prepare students to be digital story-tellers? How do we blend foundational principles of good storytelling with instruction on using new technologies to capture and tell them? What is the process for moving students from idea to digital story. For additional information contact Dawn Francis, Cabrini College at dawn.francis@gmail.com or 610-902-8379. To sign-up for the workshop go to: https://aejmc2.wufoo.com/forms/2015-small-programs-interest-group-workshop/ (SPIG)

3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Tips for Putting Your Courses – and Programs – Online — (Part Two)
This panel will explore the changing newsroom. Many schools are resorting to the cloud for software. Some universities are asking students to supply their own equipment or use loaners from a central source. What are the best practices in this arena? For additional information contact Wally Metts, Spring Arbor University at wally.metts@arbor.edu or 517-750-6491. To sign-up for the workshop go to: https://aejmc2.wufoo.com/forms/2015-small-programs-interest-group-workshop/ (SPIG)
Part Two will immediately follow part one in the same room.

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
(w4) Computer-Aided Content Analysis
$55 Fee / $30 Graduate Students (Participation limited to 75)
In the world of Big Data, researchers have access to a plethora of data, which often can be difficult to manage. Even outside of explicitly “Big Data” contexts, communication researchers often can find themselves buried in piles of textual data. Recent developments in textual analysis, or computer-aided content analysis, can help researchers manage this textual data and provide valuable research insights. The purpose of this pre-conference is to introduce attendees to various ways that large amounts of textual data can be analyzed using new computational methods. For information, contact Myiah Hutchens at myiah.hutchens@gmail.com or 614-917-7895. (CTAM, PCIG)

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

(w5) Beyond Storytelling: How to Turn Oral History into Scholarship and Public Knowledge
$10 Fee (Participation limited to 40)
In recent decades oral history has been increasingly recognized as vital to understanding the plurality yet connectedness of human experiences. Journalists, as witnesses, chroniclers, and sometimes agents of history, have been important subjects in numerous oral history collections. Oral history, however, is often misperceived as random collections of personal accounts of the past.  This preconference workshop will thus focus on turning oral history into publishable scholarship, transforming oral history into public knowledge through digital archiving, and using oral history to explore neglected or suppressed media and cultural phenomena.   The panelists will showcase their oral history projects and discuss a wide range of topics related to oral history research.  For information, contact Yong Volz at volzy@misssouri.edu or 573-882-2159. (HIST, NOND)

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
“Hackathons, Coming to a University Near You!: How to Bring Journalists, Activists and Programmers Together to Increase Public Understanding”
This panel, designed as an interactive workshop, brings together the Institute for Justice and Journalism (located in Oakland, CA) and journalism professors to explain how to organize, and why journalism and mass communication schools should want to hold a hackathon on their campuses. Some hackathons have been criticized for not being ethnically or intellectually diverse. The Institute for Justice and Journalism’s highly successful Migrahacks are an exception, as they assist journalists, activists and computer programmers from a variety of diverse backgrounds to work together to shed light on the issue of migration around the world. The hackathons include training in the latest digital tools for journalism, and results in the creation of web-based and data driven content. The proposed teaching workshop will focus on the IJJ Migrahack model, and allow participants and the audience to look for ways to expand the model in an effort to create and organize other issue-oriented hackathons on college campuses around the country. The panel also will include discussion about the historical relationship between and activists and journalists. For additional information contact Celeste Gonzalez de Bustamante, University of Arizona at 520-271-7402 or celeste@email.arizona.edu. (MACD, CTEC, INTC)

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
(w6) Social Media Measurement: Essentials for the Classroom and the Profession
$10 Fee (Participation limited to 50)
In this combined presentation from educators and professionals, attendees will learn the basics of social media measurement, including the creation of dashboards, the use of Google Analytics, and the application of big data to social media campaigns. Assignments will be shared that involve social media listening and the use of Facebook Insights. During the second segment of the pre-conference, attendees can attend roundtable demonstrations to learn how to use various tools for monitoring online interaction. Finally, a panel of leading professionals will reflect upon the teaching tips shared by the instructor panel, address what students need to know about social media measurement for entry-level jobs, and discuss the future of social media measurement. For information, contact Tiffany Gallicano at derville@uoregon.edu or 541-346-2035. (PRDV, MCSD)

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Honoring the Career of Joe Saltzman: Journalist, Teacher, Mentor, and Pioneer
This panel will explore the career of Joe Saltzman, the director of the Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture and professor of journalism at the Annenberg School of Communication & Journalism at the University of Southern California. Fellow colleagues and friends will reflect on his influence as a scholar, teacher, and mentor. Joe will share his own thoughts on his rewarding profession and discuss the next steps in his storied career. For additional information contact Brad Yates, University of West Georgia at byates@westga.edu or 678-839-4938. (ESIG)

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
More Than A Good Story: Methods for Teaching Digital Storytelling — (Part One)
A good story grabs attention. A good multimedia story does more than that. It uses a cohesive mix of multiple media to bring audiences into the setting, journey with the story characters, and feel a range of emotions. Can students learn how to produce these compelling stories in a semester’s timeframe? This session will examine methods for effectively instructing hands-on courses on digital storytelling. How do we prepare students to be digital story-tellers? How do we blend foundational principles of good storytelling with instruction on using new technologies to capture and tell them? What is the process for moving students from idea to digital story. For additional information contact Dawn Francis, Cabrini College at dawn.francis@gmail.com or 610-902-8379.
Tips for Putting Your Courses – and Programs – Online — (Part Two)
This panel will explore the changing newsroom. Many schools are resorting to the cloud for software. Some universities are asking students to supply their own equipment or use loaners from a central source. What are the best practices in this arena? For additional information contact Wally Metts, Spring Arbor University at wally.metts@arbor.edu or 517-750-6491. (SPIG)

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
(w7) Adjunct/Instructor Workshop: Nuts and Bolts
$25 Fee
This workshop will provide ideas and advice for your work in the classroom. Topics will include turning real-life experiences into exercises, running a classroom and writing a syllabus, dos and don’ts of classroom operations, time management and work-life balance, and grading and rubrics. Contact is Chris Roush, North Carolina at croush@email.unc.edu. (AEJMC Elected Standing Committee on Teaching)

1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Empowering Junior Faculty: Pathways to Success in the Academy
Looking for some advice and mentorship on being a leader and moving up in the academic world? This third annual workshop will help junior faculty move forward in their careers through mentoring, networking and preparing for tenure and/or promotion or other leadership roles in academia.  Speakers include senior scholars, including AEJMC President Elizabeth Toth, Maryland, and other administrators and women who have achieved significant leadership positions. Keynote speaker is Marie Hardin, dean of the College of Communications at Penn State University. Also included are roundtables and panels on leadership, tenure and promotion, time management and other topics featuring women who have succeeded in the academy. We are seeking a cohort of 25 tenure-track women for this pre-convention workshop on August 5. Those participating will be invited to take part in activities of both the Kopenhaver Center and the CSW during the following year and will become fellows of the program. Applications are due by June 1 to Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver, Florida International, at kopenhav@fiu.edu. (CoAF, Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver Center for the Advancement of Women in Communication, FIU)

5:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
(w8) Internships and Careers “Bootcamp” Workshop
$5 Fee (Participation is limited to 20)
The ICIG Workshop will provide a variety of tips and “Best Practices” information for internship advisors currently developing or evaluating their internships programs. The session shall also feature a discussion of survey results charting the value of internships for students. There shall also be a session on how to go about creating a career and internships training program for students. For additional information contact Abhinav Aima, Pennsylvania State University at aka11@psu.edu. (ICIG)

5:30 to 9:30 p.m.
(w9) Welcome to Administration: Workshop for New Deans, Directors and Chairs
$45 Fee
(Participation limited to 30)
This workshop is designed for people new to administration. Speakers will talk about the expectations of your new job, how to find time for fundraising, and building a cohesive faculty.  The session will also provide time to network with other new administrators. Contact is Jan Slater, Illinois at slaterj@illinois.edu. (ASJMC)

5:30 to 10:00 p.m.
(w10)
Insights into Academic Administration: A Collaborative on the Qualities of Stellar Academic Leaders
$35 Fee
(Participation limited to 30)
As the fields within mass communication adapt to changes in society, government and technology, those of us charged with educating the next generations of content producers, curators, managers and consumers must determine the best methods to do so. In this era of media evolution, we see a growing and persistent need for leaders to fill the openings for deans and directions at schools nationwide. This session will provide attendees the opportunity to learn from one another, as well as sitting deans from Elon, Penn State, Northwestern, University of North Texas and LSU. Topics will include: (a) Transitioning into Leadership (or Going to the Dark side) – How relationships change when transitioning into leadership, and how to leverage faculty skills into leadership skills; (b) The Daily Life of Leadership- How your work changes in regards to autonomy, flexibility, internal and external obligations; (c) The Nuts and Bolts of Leadership- Things you need to know how to do such as fundraising, strategic planning, personnel issues; (d) Ways of Being-  Orientations that aid administrative work (Introspective, intuitive, openness to feedback, approachability, non-reactionary, encouraging); (e) Understanding Your Leadership Style – Discussions on who you are (your multiple and fluid identities and their intersections, family or marital status, background, professional experiences, handling intercultural conflicts) and how it affects your leadership style. This session is for faculty colleagues who are interested in exploring faculty or administrative leadership. Please sign up early. You can sign up when you register for the San Francisco conference. (Scripps Howard Foundation, Louisiana State University and Elon University)

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