RMIG Officer Bios for 2014-2015

Head: Chiung Hwang Chen (Brigham Young University Hawaii)

Warm aloha,
It was very nice seeing many of you in Montreal. We had a great convention. I especially would like to thank all who participated in the program. Your great work contributed much to the success of RMIG panels.
It is unusual for almost the entire team from last year to continue serve in this coming year. I personally feel extremely honored for the opportunity. Welcome Rick, Mariam, and Robbie to the team.  We set some goals (see the annual report below) for this year and will strive to achieve them with your help.
Attached is the list of the RMIG officers and their contact information. Let us know if you have ideas for joint panels (see below for the call) or suggestions on how we can better serve our members. We always welcome contributions to the RMIG newsletter, especially ideas or experiences on teaching, research, or PF&R (Professional Fairness and Responsibility) related issues.
Mahalo for your support and have a fruitful year!

Vice Head: Myna German (Delaware State University)

Dr. Myna German, chair of the Department of Mass Communication at Delaware State University, has recently returned from Portugal, where she presented a symposium on topics relating to her co-published book Migration, Technology and Transculturation (via Delaware State University).

Membership Chair: Daniel Stout (Brigham Young University Hawaii)

Daniel Stout is a professor of international cultural studies at Brigham Young University-Hawaii. He is currently co-editor of the Journal of Media and Religion. He brings an impressive research publication record with him including three edited books, over two dozen book chapters and scholarly/professional articles. He is an internationally known expert on religion and the mass media.  His professional experience is in advertising at the Houston Chronicle. He holds a Ph.D. from Rutgers University, an M.A. from the University of Georgia and a B.A. from Brigham Young University.

Teaching Chair: Rick Moore (Boise State University)

Rick C. Moore earned his doctorate from the University of Oregon and has taught at Boise State since 1994. He loves teaching a wide variety of courses in communication theory, research, and criticism. Though occasionally dabbling in other “contexts” of communication, he mainly teaches courses related to mass communication.  Dr. Moore’s research interests are in the area of mass communication and ideology. Much of his writing has investigated media portrayal of religious and environmental issues. Another key area of study is the social thought of Jacques Ellul, a French theorist/theologian who asked challenging questions about the role of technology in our lives. Writing under his full name of Rick Clifton Moore, Dr. Moore has published articles in: The Journal of Communication; Mass Media & Society; The Journal of Media and Religion; The Bulletin of Science, Technology, and Society; Advertising and Society Review;The Ellul Forum; and The Journal for Peace and Justice Studies.  When not in his office, in the classroom, or the library, Rick enjoys spending time with his wife Kim and his children Emily and Danny. He also has a fondness for old houses (the Moore’s version being a perpetual work-in-progress) and occasionally gets to spend time wading in Idaho’s beautiful mountain streams.

Research Co-chair: Joel Campbell (Brigham Young University) & Julia Duin (University of Memphis)

Dr. Joel Campbell, RMIG research chair, is an associate professor in journalism in Brigham Young University Department of Communications. He holds a master’s degree in journalism from Ohio State University. Previously, he worked for nearly 20 years as a reporter and editor for newspapers in Salt Lake City. He teaches media writing, journalism principles, media and religion, media ethics and research courses. His new-found research interest is media and religion, but has also been active in First Amendment and Freedom of Information research and advocacy. He has presented or published papers on media coverage of the Mitt Romney’s Mormonism, Artemus Ward’s 19th Century “Among the Mormons” show, media coverage of Mormons’ posthumous baptism of Jews, “The Mormon” newspaper in New York City from 1850-1857, and Marie Ogden’s New Age “Home of Truth” colony in southeast Utah.

Julia Duin currently serves as the ninth visiting Snedden Chair of Journalism at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The Chair and associated Snedden Lecture series brings distinguished journalists to campus for visits as short as three days on up to Duin’s year-long faculty appointment (through spring 2015) within UAF’s College of Liberal Arts.
The program was funded through a generous $2.6 million endowment established by the late Helen Snedden. That gift, honoring the legacy of her husband, longtime News-Miner Publisher C.W. Snedden, has enlivened classrooms and community forums with perspectives of more than a dozen Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters, photographers and editors since 2005.
Duin earned her BA in English from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Ore., then began her career in journalism covering police and municipalities for small newspapers in Oregon and South Florida. In 1986, she landed a job with the Houston Chronicle as a full-time religion writer. She received a MA in religion at a seminary in western Pennsylvania in 1992. She then worked as a city editor for the Daily Times in Farmington NM before moving to Washington DC in 1995 to be an assistant national editor with the Washington Times.
She spent more than 14 years with the Times and published several books, including Quitting Church: Why the Faithful are Fleeing and What to Do About It and Days of Fire and Glory: The Rise and Fall of a Charismatic Community.
Duin has won numerous awards for her work, which spans everything from a five-part series on America’s clergy to “female feticide” (gender-selective abortions) in India. Other notable assignments include reporting on Kurds in northern Iraq and the 2005 election of Pope Benedict.
In recent years she has written extensively for the Washington Post Sunday magazine and Style section, as well as the EconomistCNN.com and the Wall Street Journal. Her latest book project involves 20-something Pentecostal serpent handlers in Appalachia who use Facebook to spread their beliefs. In December, she expects to receive a second MA (in journalism) with the University of Memphis.

PF&R Chair: Robbie Morganfield (University of Maryland)

Robbie R. Morganfield, a Ph.D. candidate in Public Communication at the University of Maryland, expects to defend his dissertation in fall 2014. His topic: Mainstream and Alternative Newspaper Framing of the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright during the 2008 U.S. Presidential Primary Campaign. Morganfield aspires to become a department chair and has interest in teaching across disciplines, especially media, communication and religion. Morganfield has a broad-based background as an award-winning journalist who served as a reporter, editor, columnist and staff development director at major metropolitan daily newspapers; a feted college classroom journalism and communication instructor and workshop presenter; and effective administrator in the para-professional and religious nonprofit sectors. His research interests include journalism history, ethics, intercultural communication, and religion and media. Morganfield holds a bachelor degree in journalism (Ole Miss), a master degree in public affairs journalism with a minor in educational policy and leadership (The Ohio State University), and a master of divinity degree (Texas Christian University). He has taught reporting, editing, ethics and mass communication survey courses, as well as intercultural communication and communication for academic success. He developed curriculum, taught modules and served as executive director of a Freedom Forum institute that trained and placed midcareer professionals from other fields in jobs at about 80 newspapers. He directed an online newsroom, developed a digital communication training curriculum and developed workshops and negotiated internships for students from historically black colleges and universities. He coached editors and publishers on diversity matters and served as a frequent workshop presenter at conferences across the nation. He also is a Methodist Church pastor.

Newsletter Co-editor: Greg Perreault (University of Missouri) & Mariam Alkazemi (University of Florida)

Gregory P. Perreault is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Missouri School of Journalism. His dissertation “Sacred Space Evaders: Protestant Normativity in Digital Game Journalism” explores the latent protestant values in digital game journalism. He holds an M.A. in Communication, Culture & Technology from Georgetown University and a B.A. from Palm Beach Atlantic University in South Florida. His peer-reviewed research has appeared in the Journal of Media and Religion and the Journal of Contemporary Religion. He worked for several years in newspapers in South Florida and has had work published in USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, The Miami Herald and The Huffington Post. 

Mariam Alkazemi is a doctoral candidate at the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications.  Although she identifies as a Muslim, she enjoys learning about various religions.  Over the years, she has visited a church, a synagogue, a Hindu temple, a Buddhist temple in addition to a mosque.  She is fascinated by the aspects of religion that are unique to certain religious traditions and those that are universal. Her personal interest in religion has fueled her professional research interests focusing on religion and the media.  Fluent in the English and Arabic languages, she hopes to produce research that may serve as a cultural bridge between the United States and the Arab and Muslim world.  Her peer-reviewed publications appear in Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism and Journal of Religion, Media & Digital Culture. At Florida she has taught four classes: Journalism Studies, Mass Media and You, World Communication Systems, and Applied Fact-Finding.  She is currently serving as the co-editor of the Religion and Media Interest Group’s newsletter.

 

 

Posted in News.

2014 Summer Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS: Summer 2014

Welcome to the Summer 2014 Newsletter! For AEJMC 2014, please remember you will need a passport in order to attend the conference. Early registration for the conference ends on July 7th.

To read the articles below, simply click on the link and it will take you to the individual post. Thanks for reading! It’s been a pleasure serving you and being a part of this team. Safe travels to Montreal!

Sincerely,

Greg Perreault
Newsletter editor (2013-2014)

Table of Contents

1. On the Paper/Panel Competition by Myna German

2. Tuesday Pre-Conference Workshops (AEJMC 2014)

3. Religion, Culture and Media: Don’t Try This At Home by Michael Longinow

4. Why I Research Religion in Digital Games by Greg Perreault

5. Why I Don’t Plan to Teach Religion Reporting Anymore by Debra Mason

6. Letter from the Chair and the Full List of RMIG 2014 Panels

Posted in Newsletters.

On the Paper/Panel Competition

This year has been a banner year for our division, headed by Dr. Chiung Chen from Brigham Young University-Hawaii. Chiung has been an incredible division head, training our officers and prompting everyone in the group toward excellence.

We have 7 sessions coming up at the conference, 14 research papers being presented in 4 groups of 3 and 2 in the scholar-to-scholar poster session. We have also participated in formation of two pre-conference panels the first Tuesday of the conference and three other panels during the conference.

Several graduate students and faculty have contacted us about getting active in the group. We will have our election of officers at the business meeting of the conference and hopefully they can come into the leadership group at the entry-levels. We also need new people to take a place and move up the leadership ladder.

Prof. Joel Campbell (Brigham Young University-Provo) has done a great job as research chair. See you in Montreal!

Myna German, Vice-Chair

Posted in Conferences.

Why I research religion in digital games

DSC_7603By Greg Perreault, Newsletter Editor

Like most children in my generation, I grew up playing digital games. Super Mario Bros., Sonic the Hedgehog, and The Legend of Zelda were not, in my experience, marks of absence from the social world but an indication of presence within it. Because everyone played. You learned you had to pass the controller.

The games have aged. Those early games have given way to Angry Birds and Temple Run, as well as the more serious Dante’s Inferno and Bioshock Infinite. Gaming itself has achieved a level of near ubiquity. Nearly seventy percent of Americans play digital games regularly and, to look to the future, among 14- to 17-year-old girls regular game play is 94 percent and 99 percent among boys. Want your heart skip a beat? See the chart below. USA Today, Forbes Magazine, Wired Magazine, Entertainment Weekly, The New York Times and The Washington Post all now have reporters who cover digital games as at least a part of their beat.

As a journalist and a young academic (as well as a father), these numbers are rather striking. Much of my early research at Georgetown University and the Missouri School of Journalism has been on press discourse regarding religion–a tradition pioneered by truly brilliant scholars like Judith Buddenbaum and Stewart Hoover. But in the middle of my career at Missouri, I began to do some research on this topic. Gaming deserves more attention in Media and Religion research not solely because of its growth as a medium but also because of the quality of the narratives. The storytelling in games has developed so that it can now take part in the larger narratives of our culture such as the connection between religion and violence and the place of religion in civil society.

Are-You-There-God-Its-a-Me-MarioPerhaps if the predominant games on the market continued to be Pac-Man, Mrs. Pac-Man, Child of Pac-Man ad infinitum, one could still argue for the examination of exploring the subtleties of religion in these games (e.g. the implicit religion of digital game play, as explored by Rachel Wagner). But as games have grown in popularity so have they also grown in the complexity of the stories they can tell.

In 2013, 30-minutes of gameplay from Beyond: Two Souls premiered at Tribeca Film Festival. Similarly, a movie based on the Halo franchise was nominated for an Emmy. In Bioshock: Infinite (2013), it is impossible to explore the surroundings of the game without recognizing the overt religiousity of the culture. Set in a city in the clouds, Columbia, the game is a first-person shooter in which the player must rescue a young woman named Elizabeth.  Just to enter the city, the player’s avatar must submit to a baptism. The imagery in Bioshock: Infinite brought about widespread discussion in the press and blogs. One developer at the digital game company reportedly threatened to quit over the religious depictions in the game.

Common themes in digital game narratives include killing God or Satan, evil/hypocritical establishment religious figures, god figure(s) as a motivator for violence, and saving your game progress by praying to a religious shrine. All of these raise interesting theoretical questions regarding both the production and the reception of such games.

This topic has drawn increasing academic interest as evidenced by a special issue on gaming in the Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet this past spring and the recently-released edited volume by Heidi Campbell and Gregory Grieve, Playing with Religion in Digital Games.

My dissertation joins my two worlds together by exploring how digital game journalists address (or don’t) the religious narratives in digital games. Digital games will continue to be a part of my research in that as technology continues to develop and as their use continues to grow, so will the reflective power they have to mirror the religious discussions of society.

vidGames04

Posted in Professional Development.

Religion, Culture and Media: Try This At Home

Photo courtesy of Biola University.

Photo courtesy of Biola University.

By Michael Longinow

Pedagogy is a journey. We don’t get anywhere until we gas it up, merge into traffic and get it on. So this semester I stopped talking about the interplay of faith, culture and media. I set up a series of projects whereby all students in my class would have to interact with a person of another culture and another faith. I couldn’t require that this encounter be in a language other than English, but this was strongly encouraged.
Last time I tried this, I required students to visit a place of worship that was not Christian. It didn’t work — mostly because I don’t teach in a department of religion and I wasn’t preparing students well enough to understand what they were encountering in those places of worship.
This time it was about food (or nails, or hair, or dresses.) Students had to write a series of business-related stories. The angle was the cross-cultural and faith-interactive aspects of business in the Los Angeles area. There’s a whole world to choose from. Complaints of no place were muted; I don’t say silenced because there is an amazing resilience to the undergraduate ability to find creative cross-cultural experience impossible. But the conversations about impossible are shorter.
Students started the class with a self-reflective paper about their own faith journey. It was, by design, a probe into why they believe what they believe. If they believe little or nothing, they still had to write it about and tell why. The only real requirement on this paper was honesty and detail.
Story 1 was about business run by someone from another country. Students were required to do research on the trends in businesses of that kind, of that description, in the business press, in sociology journals, in journals of anthropology. The more they complied with this requirement, the better went their interviews. Religion wasn’t supposed to be part of this story unless it came up. The point was culture: how internationals navigated majority culture to do business, whether they catered mostly to those of their own culture or not, how they dealt with transition to majority culture themselves and those they hired or worked alongside in what are often multicultural collections of businesses in plazas and malls. All students had to
Story 2 was about faith, religious experience, and these business owners’ sense of the spiritual as they did business. The results were an interesting study. Some were quite open about their faith, with icons and religious artifacts spread throughout the business: Buddhas big and small, wall-hangings showing religious scenes, incense by the cash register.
But what was a surprise was the response to questions. Most of my students are white and look and act like majority culture folks. For them to ask a person of another culture about their faith, in the workplace, was for some business owners an affront or a threat. Some clammed up. The young owners, in particular, said the faith artifacts were just culture — stuff they put up to make customers happy. The extreme case was a young Muslim woman who did eyebrow threading in her home. It was helping paying the bills for her family and was going strong, even though it wasn’t advertised other than word of mouth. When the question of faith came up, the woman told the student’s Arabic interpreter that she couldn’t answer any questions about religion because she’d been told by legal counsel never to bring it up. She was an asylee.
The project was a massive wake-up call in this Christian university where students opt into an environment where their faith in Christ is nurtured regularly in optional chapel services, dorm Bible studies and student-led social action efforts driven by commitment to Christ-driven compassion for the poor, the alienated, the enslaved.
The key, students learned, was persistence in the journalistic pursuit. Cross-cultural journalism is hard because it’s personal. It can’t be done (with any success) unless one is bought in. And to buy in, students need to confront their own faith and what it means in culture around them.
Books I used for this project were Judith Buddenbaum’s “Reporting News About Religion” (note: hard to find — for me and students), Harris-Schaupp’s “Being White: Finding our Place in a MultiEthnic World,” and generous helpings of YouTube insights from cross-cultural journalists in the U.S., Britain and other parts of the developed world.
Video clips about cross-cultural encounter that kept them all breathing were from “The Terminal,” “Blood Diamond,” and “Hidalgo.”
Posted in Professional Development. Tagged .

Tuesday Pre-Conference Workshops (AEJMC 2014)

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (Session 1 of 3)
“Writing It Right for Academic and Scholarly Audiences”
This session will consist of an interactive panel session that will address key topics in academic writing and publishing. Unlike most of the many previous (and ever popular) sessions AEJMC has held on this topic, this panel will focus in detail on the mechanics of writing about research for publication. The topics that will be addressed include: how research manuscripts should be organized and structured (covering both social science and humanities-based research); how a writer effectively constructs a literature review and uses previous research; strategies for argumentation and for acknowledging and addressing a study’s weaknesses and limitations; technical preparation of manuscripts for review; and communicating with editors and reviewers through the publication process. The goal of the workshop will be to help emerging scholars understand how they need to think about the many different elements that go into writing clearly and effectively about research. The panel also will seek to shed light on how editors and reviewers read manuscripts. For additional information, contact Charlene Simmons, Tennessee at Chattanooga, Charlene-Simmons@utc.edu, or at 423-521-2960. To register for this workshop go tohttps://aejmc2.wufoo.com/forms/2014-mmec-etch-and-rmig-workshops/ (MMEC, ETHC, RMIG)

1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Session 3 of 3)
“Writing For Scholarly Journals: Tips from the Editors”
Editors of refereed academic publications in media economics, media and religion, and media ethics who work within AEJMC will present an afternoon panel explaining: 1) how best to submit articles, reviews, and especially research for possible publication; 2) the uniqueness, scope, and vision of each featured refereed publication; 3) a behind-the-scenes view of editing, reviewing, and article selection to help answer the question “what are editors of scholarly journals looking for from contributors?” 4) how editors and contributors working together may improve scholarship, research, and cooperation within the future of our fields. The panelists and discussant will also remain up to one hour following the panel to advise individuals who have ideas for possible articles and further questions. For additional information, contact Charlene Simmons, Tennessee at Chattanooga, Charlene-Simmons@utc.edu, or at 423-521-2960. To register for this workshop go to https://aejmc2.wufoo.com/forms/2014-mmec-etch-and-rmig-workshops/ (ETHC)

Posted in Conferences, News.

Letter from the Chair and RMIG’s 2014 Panels

Our term will come to an end in August. We want to thank all RMIG members and friends for your support and help. We have learned a lot this year through our service. We have put out 4 excellent newsletters (thanks particularly to Greg for his time and effort) and come up with an exciting program for this year’s conference in Montreal. Please come join the fun and meet your RMIG colleagues. Below is a list of panels RMIG is involved in. Make sure to have your passport ready for the trip! Hope to see you all in Montreal.

-Chiung Hwang Chen, Chair

****

Tuesday August 5

9 am to Noon

Media Management and Economic and Media Ethics Divisions and Religion and Media Interest Group

Workshop Session: Writing It Right for Academic and Scholarly Audiences (Session I)
Moderating/Presiding: Bozena Mierzejewsja, Fordham

Pre-registration is required.

1:30 pm to 5 pm

Media Management and Economic and Media Ethics Divisions and Religion and Media Interest Group

Workshop Session: Writing It Right for Academic and Scholarly Audiences (Session II)
Moderating/Presiding: Bozena Mierzejewsja, Fordham

Session III: Writing For Scholarly Journals: Tips from the Editors

Presiding/Moderating: Tom Cooper, Emerson

Panelists:   Judith Buddenbaum, co-editor, Journal of Media and Religion, Colorado State

Hugh J. Martin, editor, Journal of Media Economics, Ohio

Patrick Plaisance, editor, Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Colorado State

Daniel Stout, co-editor, Journal of Media and Religion, BYU Hawaii

 ____

Wednesday August 6

8:15 am to 9:45 am

Religion and Media Interest Group

Refereed Paper Research Session: Islam and media: Rhetoric, framing, and representation

Moderating/Presiding: Paola Banchero, Alaska Anchorage

Panelists:  Just add a verse from the Quran: Effects of religious rhetoric in gain (and loss) framed anti-alcohol messages with a Palestinian sample, Saleem Alhabash, Michigan State; Nasser Almutairi, Michigan State; Mohammed Abu Rub, Birzeit University

Mediatization of religion: How the Indonesian Muslim diasporas mediatized Islamic practices, Yearry Setianto,* Ohio

Night and day: An illustration of framing using moral foundations to examine public opinion about the 2010 Oklahoma sharia ban, Brian J. Bowe, Michigan State; Jennifer Hoewe, Penn State

Us and them: A meta-analysis of research on media representation of Muslims and Islam from 2000 to 2013, Saifuddin Ahmed, Nanyang Tech; Joerg Matthes, University of Vienna

*Top student paper

10 am to 11:30 am

Religion and Media Interest Group

Refereed Paper Research Session: Salvation in pop culture and new media

Moderating/Presiding: Julia Duin, Memphis

Panelists:  Do you want to feel the love of Christ? There’s an app for that: Understanding tablet media as the new electronic church, Jim Trammell,* High Point

The new scroll: Digital devices in Bible study and worship, Kathy Richardson, Berry College; Carol Pardun, South Carolina

These will not inherit the kingdom of reality TV: Media Elites’ views on religion and the paradigm of corporate media, Rick Moore, Boise State

Pop music and the search for the numinous: Exploring the emergence of the secular hymn in post-modern culture, Steven Thomsen, BYU; Quint Randle, BYU; Matthew J. Lewis, BYU

*Top faculty paper

1:30 pm to 3 pm

Religion and Media and Sports Communication Interest Groups

Research Panel Session: The Religion of Sports

Moderating/Presiding: Chiung Hwang Chen, BYU Hawaii

Panelists: Turning the Other Cheek: The Faith of Jackie Robinson, Chris Lamb, IUPUI

The Rise of the Use of Prayer in Sports, Alan Goldenbach, Utica

Sports as Religion, Mary Lou Sheffer, Southern Mississippi

Openly Religious Sports Figures, Paola Banchero, Alaska Anchorage

Tim Tebow’s Time, Howard Schlossberg, Columbia College

 ____

Thursday August 7

8:15 am to 9:45 am

Religion and Media Interest Group and Media Management and Economic Division

Research Panel Session: Theorizing the Religious Media Marketplace: God, Media, and Money

Moderating/Presiding: Debra Mason, Missouri

Panelists: The Praise that Pays: Marketing, Money, and Christian Media, Jim Trammell, High Point

Christian Commerce, Creationism and Capitalism: Religion in the Retail Marketplace, Anthony Hatcher, Elon

The Currency of Cool in the Christian Culture Industry, Brett McCracken, Biola

Balancing Ministry and Commerce: The Christian Artist’s Perspective, Barry Blair, Asbury

 

11:45 am to 1:15 pm

Religion and Media Interest Group

Refereed Paper Research Session: Framing religions, religiosity, and religious symbols

Moderating/Presiding: Myna German, Delaware State

Panelists:  Newspaper coverage of Christianity in South Korea, 1996-2005, Taisik Hwang, Georgia

Magazine iconography: portrayals of religion on magazine covers, Joy Jenkins, Missouri; Mimi Perreault, Missouri; Gregory Perreault, Missouri

Facebook and revival in Appalachia: Some qualitative analyses of attitudes toward serpent-handling, Julia Duin, Memphis

Does inner peace correlate with giving a piece of your mind? Religiosity, media exposure and tolerance for disagreement about religion, Mariam Alkazemi, Florida

 

1:30 pm to 3 pm

Religion and Media Interest Group

Business Session: Members’ Meeting

Moderating/Presiding: Chiung Hwang Chen, BYU Hawaii

____

Friday, August 8

8:00-10:00 am

RMIG Social: Religion and Media in Montreal

Panel discussion on Quebec’s Charter of Values and other issues. Featuring professional journalists in the Montreal region

 

12:15-1:30 pm

Religion and Media Interest Group

Refereed Paper Research Session: Scholar to Scholar

Panelists: The religious and moral beliefs of university leaders and the beginnings of American journalism education, Jeffery Smith, Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Bishop Richard R. Wright Jr.: The Christian recorder and social responsibility, Robbie Morganfield, Maryland

 ____

Saturday, August 9

11 am to 12:30 pm

Religion and Media and Small Programs Interest Groups

Teaching Panel Session: Teaching applied ethics at a denominational or sectarian institution

Moderating/Presiding: Michael Ray Smith, Campbell

Panelists: “To participate in the creation of a more just and humane world”: Social justice and utilitarianism in journalism education, John Jenks, Dominican

Media ethics and the Point-of-Decision Pyramid, Mitch Land, Regent

Negotiating meaning between sacred and profane: Doing cultural studies at religious institutions, Chiung Hwang Chen, BYU Hawaii

Introducing pluralism to moral absolutists and relativists, Ginny Whitehouse, Eastern Kentucky

Posted in News.

Why I don’t plan to teach religion reporting any more

debra-mason-200x300

Photo courtesy of the Missouri School of Journalism

By Debra L. Mason, Teaching Chair
I joined the teaching ranks 24 years ago as a teaching assistant while I was earning a PhD at Ohio University.

But it wasn’t until 2008 that I first taught religion reporting. That’s because I was teaching at a small liberal arts college trough the 1990s with too few students to create such a specialized course. After that, I went into nonprofit management for a few years before joining the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism in 2006.

I learned soon enough that competing with a growing number of elective skills courses and other specialized media courses in environment, investigative journalism, arts coverage and health reporting was difficult. And there was a good reason why.

During these years, we saw the religion “beat” undergo many changes, including many layoffs. In part religion was swept up with the overall downsizing of newsrooms. In part, religion was not viewed as a vital beat in the same way as education, city government or sports were. And no one had been able to get religion to support itself via designated religion pages.

The trend was well-known enough that students were picking up on it. At the same time, it was hard to find a place for students to intern or be mentored by experienced leaders on the beat. My religion reporting classes were always very small—under 10 students every time.

Let’s be clear: every one of MU’s 2,000-plus journalism students gets some religion. That’s because I guest lecture about religion in all sections of the Cross Cultural Journalism course that’s required of every journalism student. Some instructors in the course require that students read examples of religion reporting or read a chapter from Judith Buddenbaum’s religion reporting book.

I lecture on problems of religious bias, religious literacy, secularity, stereotyping and other flaws in reporting or strategic planning when religion is involved. It was only one lecture, but it had repercussions in class assignments, readings, and projects. I always felt as though it was much better than nothing. Now, I’m pleased that a new cross cultural textbook my colleagues at the University of Missouri are writing will include a full chapter on the topic, using many of the same examples and issues I’ve lectured about the past six years.

But I’ve decided that teaching a specific course on religion reporting is not the approach that will reach the most students. Instead, I’m trying to figure out how to expand the religion content in Cross Cultural Journalism. And I’m refining an experimental course called, “From Amish to Zoarastrianism: What every journalism student needs to know about religion.” It’s sort of a world religions course for journalists. It includes data about the religiosity of journalists, why demographics of religion are peculiarly complicated, specific ethical quandaries and of course, aspects of major world religions important for journalists to understand.

I’ve come to believe that the most valuable lessons I teach in religion reporting are more about religious knowledge and less about the writing or reporting itself. These are lessons about etiquette, courtesy, muting personal biases, respect for diversity and important nuances of religious language. They’re lessons every journalism student needs to understand, because religion is always lurking as a component for many of today’s most important topics.

Another reason I think my religion reporting course itself is no longer necessary is the work of a student chapter of Religion Newswriters Association. Mizzou RNA, one of three student chapters in the country, has created dynamic programming, field trips and Google hangouts with experienced reporters—some of the identical content my religion reporting course offered. By nurturing and advising the group, I have reached not just journalism students but some religious studies students who want to know how to write for public audiences. It’s an exciting development that reaches not just students in their higher level courses but freshmen and sophomores, too.

My hope is that a broader course and this focused student chapter of a professional trade association of religion specialists will reach more students and perhaps, spark a deeper interest in the topic. That way, I can mentor individual students who are passionate enough to stick it out through tight job markets and limited internships.

The market doesn’t have room for three dozen new religion reporting wannabes joining the market each year. But there is certainly room for a few talented, exceptional journalists who fall in love with the religion beat the same way I fell in love with it. And thank goodness; without them, the beat’s future would surely be in doubt.

Posted in Professional Development. Tagged .

2014 Spring Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS: Spring 2014

Welcome to the Spring 2014 Newsletter. This year, the Religion and Media Interest Group received 24 submitted papers.

For AEJMC 2014, please remember you will need a passport in order to attend the conference. Early registration for the conference ends on July 7th.

To read the articles below, simply click on the link and it will take you to the individual post. Thanks for reading!

Sincerely,

Greg Perreault
Newsletter editor (2013-2014)

Table of Contents

1. Religion and Media Interest Group 2014 Montréal Conference Sessions

2. RMIG member Michael Smith pens new book

3. Call for Cases

4. Religion and Media Interest Group Breakfast Panel by Cecile Holmes

Posted in Newsletters.

Call for Papers 4-4-14

Call for Cases

Diana Tucker and Jason Wrench, the editors of Casing Sport Communication, invite the submission of fictional case studies for the 1st edition of the volume to be published by Kendall Hunt in Fall 2015.

The cases will be built around major concepts that are seen in both sport communication research and within textbooks on the subject. The goal of these cases is to present a short fictional account of a sport communication dilemma similar in writing and format to those published in Wrench’s Casing Organizational Communication (2012, Kendall-Hunt), Wrench, Schuman, and Flayhan’s Casing Public Relations (2014, Kendall-Hunt), or the Harvard Business Review.

To see a list of the topics we hope to cover in Casing Sport Communication, please go to the website listed below. Some cases will focus on a specific topic, while others may cover multiple topics within a single case.

Our recommendation is to try to write a case that takes a unique twist on a specific topic or combine multiple topics seamlessly into a coherent case. For example, maybe you’d write a case concerning sport as religion while exploring specific issues of masculinity in fan blogs. We’re not saying these specifically, but the more unique you can make the case and the greater diversity of ideas explored within the case, the greater the likelihood that it will be included in the final volume.

Authors who base their cases on actual events in the sport world will be asked to de-identify names and facts that could identify people, organizations, or specific situations. All of the cases should be fictional as well as decision based cases where the main character is left at the end of the case needing to make some kind of decision, but the possible decision alternatives should not be spelled out for the readers. These cases are intended to be short (10-15 pages).

All case authors will be asked to submit a subsequent teacher’s note for the case that will be made available for instructors using the case study book. To help you choose a topic (or topics), and prepare your case and teacher note, please visit Jason Wrench’s website and look at the sample case and teacher’s note. You can also download the writing templates for both the case study and teacher’s note to help you prepare your case.

http://www.jasonswrench.com/writings/books/inprocess/sportcases.html

Please submit your case September 1, 2014, for inclusion in the case study book. All manuscripts should be submitted in either Microsoft Office Word or OpenOffice Writer. We can wait for the teaching notes until later in Spring 2015 if necessary.

For more information, please contact us at SportCommCases@aol.com or diana.tucker@waldenu.edu

Posted in Call for papers.

Religion and Media Interest Group Breakfast Panel

Journalists and experts in the cultural influences shaping religion and media in Quebec will be featured in a panel discussion and breakfast during the annual convention of the Association of Journalism and Mass Communication in Canada.

Sponsored by the Religion and Media Interest Group, the panel discussion will be 8-10 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 8, at a restaurant near the convention hotel. (The restaurant location will be announced later.) The breakfast will be a pay-your-own-way event. It is designed to give RMIG members the opportunities to explore current issues in religion and media in Montreal and Quebec.

Confirmed speakers for the panel include Harvey L Shepherd, editor of the Montreal Anglican and formerly long-time reporter for the Montreal Gazette and Dr. Juliann Sivulka, professor of American Studies and Mass Communications at Waseda University in Tokyo and an expert on American media and advertising. Invited speakers include other Canadian reporters, editors, broadcasters and online journalists.

In Canada, while religion specialists do not always cover religion in quite the same way as at American media outlets, religion and media issues often dominate the news. Of major impact in recent years have been ongoing scandals related to pedophilia in Canadian churches and the proposed Charter of Values. Proposals for such a charter in the Quebec national assembly have
Included language that would prohibit public employees from wearing “overt and conspicuous” religious garb at work.

For more information about the breakfast, email Cecile Holmes at cholmes@sc.edu

Cecile S. Holmes
University of South Carolina

Posted in Conferences.

Religion and Media Interest Group 2014 Montréal Conference Sessions

Tuesday, August 5
1-5 pm
How to Get Published
Co-sponsor with Media Management and Economics, Media Ethics
The pre-conference will explore issues related to successfully publishing journal articles and books including how to: formulate a strong and interesting research project, write and edit a manuscript, select a journal or book publisher to submit a manuscript to, submit an article or book for consideration, revise work based on reviewer comments, and work with editors during the revision process.

Wednesday, August 6
8:15-9:45 am
Referred paper session

10:00-11:30 am
Referred paper session

1:30-3:00 pm
The Religion of Sports
Co-sponsor with Sports and Communication Interest Group
This panel would examine several possible points of convergence between sports and religion in mass media and culture. It would look at issues such as the fanaticism toward sports teams and the ritualization of sporting events from the typical Saturday afternoon college football game to the Super Bowl. The panel would also welcome research on how religion is injected into sports with groups such as the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and the cultural and media phenomenon of people such as Tim Tebow, who are both prominent athletes and quasi-religious figures. It also would include discussion of the faith of Jackie Robinson (who played for the Montreal Royals en route to the major leagues) and prayer during broadcasted conferences.

Thursday, August 7
8:15-9:45 am
Theorizing the Religious Media Marketplace: God, Media, and Money
Co-sponsor with Media Management and Economics
The media marketplace significantly impacts the production, distribution and interpretation of texts. A “successful” text is not necessarily one with engaging content or excellent quality, but one that moves units. The Christian media industry is not immune from marketplace concerns, and generates $4.6 billion a year, according to the Association for Christian Retail. Much religion and media scholarship, however, ignores the influence that the media marketplace has on religious texts. We do not tend to acknowledge how religious media must generate revenue—even if they are not attempting to make a profit—and instead focus on its perceived religious purposes: promoting faith, engaging in belief, and so on. This panel addresses the lack of market-centered frameworks of religion and media scholarship, and explores the impact that the religious media marketplace can have on religion and media research. The presentations cover theoretical frameworks, methodologies, and sites of inquiry for market-based explorations of religious media.

11:45 am-1:15 pm
Referred paper session

1:30-3:30
Religion and Media Interest Group Members’ Meeting
Come join us and get involved. The committee will report the state of the interest group and members will elect new officials for next school year. We look forward to seeing you there.

Friday, August 8
8:00-10:00 am
RMIG Social: Religion and Media in Montreal
Panel discussion on Quebec’s Charter of Values and other issues. Featuring professional journalists in the Montreal region

Saturday, August 9
11:00 am- 12:30 pm
Teaching applied ethics at a denominational or sectarian institution
Co-sponsor with Small Programs Interest Group
This panel will discuss teaching how to integrate a faith-based philosophical framework contrasted the dominant utilitarian philosophical perspective in media practice. Moving from philosophy to praxis takes ingenuity and creative thinking. Often, students and professionals struggle with how to confront/address complex ethical dilemmas in the media. We propose featuring colleagues who have found ways to do just this.

Posted in Conferences, News.

RMIG member pens new book

photo-33BUIES CREEK — Lighthouse Publishers of the Carolinas has released “The ABC List of Feature Ideas,” a new book for budding journalists by Michael Ray Smith, a communication studies professor at Campbell University.

Smith wrote the book to help new writers generate story ideas and think strategically in planning and executing features articles for the popular press.

He said he consulted writers from across the nation on the book.

In addition to “The ABC List of Feature Ideas,” Smith is working with Lighthouse Publishers on two other books slated for release in 2014: “Seven Days to a Byline” and “How I Write.”

Smith has written hundreds of articles for newspapers, magazines and online sites including the Baltimore Sun, the Philadelphia Enquirer, USA TODAY, Christianity Today, Guidepost, Decision and others. He is the head for Small Programs Interest Group, one of the largest interest groups in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication for the 2013-2014 academic year.

In 2012 Campbell’s Faculty Development and Research Committee presented Smith with the Alumni Award for Teaching Excellence. In addition, he was named the Top 50 Journalism Professors in 2012 by www.journalismdegree.org, a web site that spotlights the best journalism professors and programs nationally.

Posted in News.

2013-2014 Winter Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS: Winter 2013-2014

Welcome to the Winter 2013-2014 Newsletter. To read the articles below, simply click on the link and it will take you to the individual post. Thanks for reading!

Sincerely,

Greg Perreault
Newsletter editor (2013-2014)

Table of Contents

1. Report from the Chair, Winter 2013-2014

2. “How to keep yourself productive” by Michael Longinow, Biola University

3. “Comparing Faculty’s Role at Public vs. Faith-Based Schools” by Denise McGill, University of South Carolina

4. Calls for Papers in Religion and Media

5. Announcement: U.S. Media Development Seminar on Palestine

Posted in Newsletters.

Report from the Chair, Winter 2013-2104

This year we had a new procedure for joint panel proposals. It turned out fine, although the process was somewhat nerve wracking. We received a few proposals and three of them were picked up by other divisions/interest groups. We also agreed to help with a pre-conference workshop on publication. We will, in other words, co-sponsor four panels for the 2014 AEJMC conference in Montreal, Canada, August 6-9:

·         “How to get published”: pre-conference workshop, co-sponsor with the Media Management and Economics, and Media Ethics Divisions.

·         “Theorizing the religious media marketplace: God, media, and money”: proposed by Jim Trammell and co-sponsor with Media Management and Economics Division.

·         “The religion of sports”: proposed by Paola Banchero and co-sponsor with the Sports Communication Interest Group.

·         “Teaching ethics at religious universities”: proposed by Michael Ray Smith and co-sponsor with the Small Program Interest Group.

Posted in News.

Comparing Faculty’s Role at Public vs. Faith-Based Schools

By Denise McGill

School of Journalism & Mass Communications, University of South Carolina

I worked for 10 years as a photojournalist in newspapers and later as an overseas correspondent for a national magazine. Upon finishing a master’s degree, I taught at two small, faith-based colleges. I’m now on faculty at a Research I, publicly-funded university.

I appreciate each setting for different reasons.

I’m a product of public education. I completed K through 12, bachelors and graduate degrees at public institutions. I’m a big fan of the concept that students at every level should have access to quality, affordable education.

That’s not to say I don’t appreciate the role of private schools. Far from it. In fact, teaching at private schools helped me see the advantages there.

There are many differences, but the biggest is the core mission of the universities. By working at a school with a faith-based mission, faculty and staff assume a common interest in building spiritual lives of students.

For instance, at a public school, a course on ethics is mostly an intellectual exercise: the students read about ethics and demonstrate they understand the material. One can earn a top grade in an ethics course without being an ethical person. With my public-school upbringing, such a paradox had never occurred to me. At a faith-based school, a course on ethics is more likely to attempt to influence students’ behavior and attitudes. Whether you agree to not, I was glad I was exposed to this paradigm.

One pleasant surprise was the approach to diversity. I taught at a parochial school with a large program in American Sign Language. Over 10 percent of the students had disabilities of all kinds, and they were woven into daily campus life. I learned to teach web design through a translator. I threw a pizza party for a newspaper staff that included a quadriplegic student who was a sports writer. These experiences helped me understand some of the nuances involved in making my classes accessible to all students.

Most of the differences in the institutions are not about faith, however. The biggest differences involve the size of the schools and the funding sources. I’m sure many of our colleagues in the Small Programs Interest Group share my experiences. The emphasis is usually squarely on teaching. In my case, all faculty taught four courses per semester.

At my first teaching gig I knew a lot about photography, but not much about teaching. I benefitted from immersion in the teaching world and good mentors from the education department.

Working at a small school is a lot like working at a small newspaper. Doing it all with fewer resources is great training for a larger market. It turns out I like being a little fish in the big pond. I like challenging all students, not just students of a particular faith. I like having time to publish creative work. But the lessons of my early career have made me a better professor now.

Denise McGill has a master’s degree from Ohio University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Missouri. She is on professional tenure track at the University of South Carolina. Current RMIG newsletter editor Greg Perreault was a student at Palm Beach Atlantic University in one of the first courses McGill ever taught. God bless him.

Posted in Professional Development.

How to keep yourself productive

michael_longinow_facultyBy Michael Longinow

Department of Journalism & Integrated Media, Biola University

Productivity is hard — for everybody. Let’s just put that out there up front.

But some people make it look easier. This article will suggest ways the best of you can do it better; those of you wondering how to get started might find new insights.

The first point to remember is that floating is bad. A key principle of survival swimming is that you’re better off moving than bobbing in place. Sharks, it’s said, will die — in most situations — if they stop swimming. The same goes for academics. So to keep active, don’t just shelve those AEJMC journals. Skim them. Mark them up. Check out the literature reviews and what’s new in how authors come at topics you enjoy.

If you’re at a stand-still, a trick for jump-starting yourself for scholarly writing is to review scholarly books. Some advice, though: don’t waste your time with reviews of stuff unrelated to what you teach or are researching. Pick reviews that will launch your own spin-off studies.

And look for bang on your buck. A wise colleague told me once that if you don’t show up professionally in ways people notice, nobody’s going to announce you. Profile matters. But beware artificial noise-making. That does more harm than good. What’s better is when what you’ve published, contributed to, or shown up in was simply unavoidable. Get your work into the right academic neighborhood — in high-traffic areas of intellectual inquiry. You know what those journals, trade publications and other media are for your discipline.

Some journals (like the AEJMC quarterly) get catalogued in EBSCOHost and other academic databases. Hint: that includes some scholarly book reviews.

Edited anthologies aren’t a bad idea either, if it’s a prominent university press or scholarly publisher (Oxford University Press comes to mind). By writing a chapter or two, you keep the wheels rolling (or the flippers going.)

Another suggestion: mark your calendar for personal writing deadlines. It helps with academic guilt. (Yes, we all feel it at times.) Some of us are swamped during the year. Come clean with that — it’s okay. Live in the moment, enjoy your teaching (more importantly, get better at it,) and take some bike rides or runs by the lake.

Pick a deadline that you know will keep you grinding through summer — your optimum time period. If you have a light fall or spring coming up, aim at a paper call that lands just after that term is over. Take a black marker and write up that wall calendar. If you’re a digital person, create pop-up reminders for yourself. By ticking off benchmarks, you keep the research and writing on track. If you’ve got scholar friends (and if you don’t, make some) get them to ask you how it’s going. Talking about your projects helps you figure them out and keeps them from stalling.

Yet another suggestion: collaborate. There are colleagues at your school or at another institution who share your passion for a research topic. That colleague might have better access to a data set or an archive than you do. Pick a topic over coffee, at the back of an AEJMC session, or even in a strategic Skype call. Nail down who’s doing what, set some benchmark deadlines for yourselves, and get rolling. A key to collaborative research is communication. Put chat sessions on the calendar and make sure you don’t miss them. Joint projects die fast when parties aren’t talking or when one person thinks something’s done and it isn’t.

Finally, multi-task. When you start one project and it’s near completion, you should have another project ready to go. Get that next one started before you’re done with the one you’re completing. Research and writing projects in overlap mode have a way of fending off the lethargy that comes when you’ve stopped swimming.

Posted in Professional Development.

Announcement: U.S. Media Development Seminar on Palestine

2014 Media Development Seminar

June 5-16, 2014 in Jerusalem and the West Bank

Applications due January 20, 2014
Awards announced February 28, 2014

The Palestinian American Research Center (PARC) announces its first Media Development Seminar on Palestine. This 12-day seminar is for U.S. faculty members with a demonstrated interest in, but little travel experience to, Palestine.

PARC will select 10 to 12 U.S. journalism/media faculty members to participate in Jerusalem-based activities that will include visiting university media departments and local media outlets as well as meeting with Palestinian scholars and members of the Palestinian media community, civil society and government.

Through these activities, participants will learn about the region, deepen their knowledge of media in and about Palestine, and build relationships with Palestinian colleagues both in academia and the media sector.

Applicants must:

  • Be U.S. citizens.
  • Be faculty members at recognized U.S. colleges or universities.  Applicants should be professors in media, journalism, or other related departments at their universities.
  • Have a demonstrated interest in Palestine.
  • Have little previous travel experience to Palestine.
  • Be willing to integrate their experiences from the seminar into their own teaching and/or pursue a joint research project or publication with a Palestinian colleague.
  • Be a member of PARC. Applicants can visit the PARC membership page for more information on how to become a member.

PARC will make all arrangements for seminars, workshops, tours, and meetings with Palestinian colleagues. PARC will cover all expenses for in-country group ground travel, accommodations, and group meals, as well as round trip international travel from the U.S. to Tel Aviv. Personal and free day expenses will be the responsibility of each faculty member.

For complete details and a PDF of the application, visit PARC’s MDS webpage at parc-us-pal.org/mediaDevSem.htm.

Posted in News.

Religion and Media Paper Calls 12/19

Call for Papers

Religion and Media Interest Group at AEJMC 2014

The Religion and Media Interest Group (RMIG) invites submission of research papers on topics that incorporate themes related to religion and media. RMIG will consider papers using quantitative, qualitative or historical research methods and accepts any recognized citation style (although APA is preferred). Please note that essays, commentaries, or simple literature reviews will not be considered. Possible areas of research focus include (but are not limited to): studies of religious group members and uses of religious or secular media; exploration of media coverage of religious issues and groups; analysis of audiences for religious news; media strategies of religious organizations; religious advertising; religious and spiritual content in popular culture; etc. Papers focusing on historically underrepresented religions, denominations and/or groups as well as religious contexts outside the U.S. are strongly encouraged. For more about RMIG and its mission, please see http://www.religionandmedia.org/our-mission-and-
goals/. Papers will be considered for presentation as traditional research panels and poster sessions.

The maximum length of research papers is 25-pages, excluding endnotes and
tables. The Religion and Media Interest Group also sponsors a Top Paper competition for both student and faculty papers. (Note: student papers may not have a faculty co-author.) The top student and faculty papers will be awarded $100 each, with the second-place student and faculty papers receiving $50 each. Co-authors will split the monetary awards, but each will receive a plaque. The awards will not be given if the selected papers are not presented at the conference. In order to be considered for the Top Paper competition, please specify either a student submission or a faculty submission on the cover page of the paper. Student papers that are not clearly identified as student submissions will not be considered for the student Top Paper Competition. All paper submissions must follow the 2014 AEJMC Uniform Paper Call.

Please pay particular attention to the following section of that call:

Before submitting your paper, please make certain that all author-identifying information has been removed and that all instructions have been followed per the AEJMC uniform paper call. Papers uploaded with author’s identifying information displayed WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED FOR REVIEW AND WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE DISQUALIFIED FROM THE COMPETITION. ALL AEJMC DIVISIONS, INTEREST GROUPS AND COMMISSION PAPER SUBMISSIONS WILL ABIDE BY THIS RULE WITHOUT EXCEPTION.

Questions should be submitted to the RMIG Research Chair Joel Campbell at
joeljaycampbell@gmail.com. Type “RMIG Research Paper” in the subject line when communicating via e-mail.

_____

Elon University 2014 Media and Religion Conference

Friday and Saturday, April 4-5, 2014

The Elon School of Communications invites paper submissions and panel proposals on any aspect of media and religion for the 5th Annual Media & Religion conference to be held on the Elon University campus Friday, April 4 and Saturday, April 5.

There will be a Friday evening keynote speaker (TBA) and paper & panel presentations on Saturday.

Conference Topics: Papers and panels may be on any topic that considers the connection between media and religion, including interfaith issues, papers on culture and religion, the press and religion, and the intersection of faith and new or traditional media forms. Papers dealing with any faith tradition are welcomed.

Paper Guidelines: Entries must be no longer than 25 pages of text, double-spaced, in 12-point type, excluding notes. The Chicago Manual of Style is preferred, but other formats are acceptable.

Papers should be submitted electronically as an MS Word document with author identification and affiliation on a title page only. Each paper must be submitted as an attachment with a 100-word abstract and contact information in the text of the email to Professor Anthony Hatcher: ahatcher@elon.edu.

Panel Guidelines: Proposals should be submitted electronically as a 1-2 page attachment, either a PDF or MS Word document. Panel proposals should include: 1) a brief description; 2) names and affiliations of moderator and participants; 3) a brief summary of each participant’s presentation. Submit panel proposals to Professor Don A. Grady: gradyd@elon.edu.

Submissions Deadline: Both paper and panel entries are due on FEBRUARY 14, 2014. Authors of accepted papers are expected to attend the conference, which will include a Friday evening keynote address and presentations all day on Saturday. Questions? Contact Anthony Hatcher at ahatcher@elon.edu.

REGISTRATION FOR THE CONFERENCE IS ONLY $25, PAYABLE ON SITE.

Elon University is located between the Triad and Triangle regions of North Carolina with easy access off of I-40/I-85. Local airports are Raleigh-Durham International and Piedmont Triad International. This event is sponsored by the Elon University School of Communications, the Truitt Center for Religious and Spiritual Life, and the Elon Center for the Study of Religion, Culture, and Society.

International Society for Media, Religion and Culture

4-6 August 2014 / post-conference workshop 7 August 2014

Over the past decade the study of media, religion and culture has broadened out from interests in media representation to thinking about the religious uses and aesthetics of media, the significance of media for religion in public life, and the role of media technologies for new forms of religious life and practice.

Building on this, the biannual conference of the International Society for Media, Religion and Culture will explore how we can understand societies in which much public encounter with religion takes place through media and in which religious life takes place through a multiplicity of mediated practices and networks. It will explore questions such as what difference do media content, aesthetics, technologies and networks make to the ways in which religion is understood and practiced? And how do we understand the nature of power in relation to these mediated networks and practices?

Keynote speakers will include Professor Jonathan Walton (Harvard), author of Watch This! The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Televangelism, Associate Professor Kathryn Lofton(Yale), author of Oprah: The Gospel of an Icon, with an address also given by the inaugural President of the Society, Professor Stewart Hoover (Colorado).

Key information about the conference, including the call for papers which is open until 3 December 2013, registration and accommodation details and the conference programme, is available here: http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/thrs/events/event2014-08-06.html. If you have any queries about the conference which are not answered in the information below then please email IMRC 2014.

We are accepting paper proposals of up to 350 words; panel proposals (which must include paper titles, 150 word abstracts for each paper, and names and titles of four participants plus a moderator/respondent); and proposals for exhibitions and/or workshops of up to 350 words. Sessions will be 1½ hours in length.

Some of the questions that may be addressed in paper, panel, workshop, or exhibition proposals include:

  • The role of media in shaping religious and cultural understandings
  • Emergent networks of meaning, religion, and power
  • Theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of religion and media
  • The role of religious and humanitarian organizations in cross-national justice and media initiatives
  • Media and human rights
  • Media, religion, and authority
  • Religious conflict and media representation
  • Religion and film
  • Growing up multi-cultural and multi-religious in a mediated world
  • Religion, globalization and cosmopolitanism
  • The role of media in the emergence of global religious and cultural movements
  • Diasporic media and transnational religious communities
  • Media, religion and global politics
  • The mediatization of religion
  • Religion, media, and the global marketplace

Proposals should be sent to Professor Lynn Schofield Clark, University of Denver (Lynn.Clark@du.edu) by 3 December 2013. Notification of acceptances will be sent out from 15th January 2014.

Posted in Call for papers.

2013 Fall Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS: FALL 2013

Welcome to the Fall 2013 Newsletter. To read the articles below, simply click on the link and it will take you to the individual post. Thanks for reading!

Sincerely,

Greg Perreault
Newsletter editor (2013-2014)

Table of Contents

1. “Encouraging the continued exploration of religion and media” by Jennifer Hoewe, Penn State University

2. New Officer Bios for the Religion and Media Interest Group

3. Calls for Papers and Panels in Religion and Media

4. RMIG Annual Report (2012-2013)

Posted in Newsletters. Tagged , , , , , , .

RMIG Officer Bios for 2013-2014

Chair: Chiung Hwang Chen, Brigham Young University-Hawaii (e-mail)

It’s an honor to head the Religion and Media Interest Group this year; I hope we have a fruitful year working together.

I received my Ph.D. degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the University of Iowa and am currently an associate professor in the Department of International Cultural Studies at Brigham Young University Hawaii. My teaching responsibility resides mostly in the field of cultural studies, including intercultural communication, gender/race and culture, and media and culture, etc. In addition to religion and media, my research areas also touch on Journalistic narratives in Chinese speaking regions, Asian American history and contemporary issues, feminism, and more recently gender and sport narratives in Polynesia.

I am a woman of few words, so I don’t really have much else to say. But I do very much appreciate this year’s officers for their willingness to help. I am looking forward to working with them and to serving the RMIG community. Please don’t hesitate to contact us when you need information regarding RMIG’s functions.

Vice Head/Program: Myna German, Delaware State University (e-mail)

Dr. Myna German, chair of the Department of Mass Communication at Delaware State University, has recently returned from Portugal, where she presented a symposium on topics relating to her co-published book Migration, Technology and Transculturation (via Delaware State University).

Teaching chair: Debra L. Mason, University of Missouri (e-mail)

Dr. Debra Mason brings more than 25 years of professional reporting, research, and teaching experience to her position. Her major religion and media research work includes a content audit of religion news spanning 50 years and the largest telephone survey of religion journalists. She edited the recently published Religion Reporting: A Guide to Journalism’s Best Beat, and co-edited Readings in Religion as News, a collection of religion news from the colonial era to the present. Mason also serves on the editorial board and is book review editor for the Journal of Media and Religion. Mason holds a doctoral degree in mass communication from Ohio University in Athens, a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University in Chicago and a master’s in theological studies from Trinity Lutheran Seminary in Columbus, Ohio. Mason has received numerous grants, awards and other honors for her work. She is a member of the American Academy of Religion, Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and the Council for National Journalism Organizations, among many others (via University of Missouri).

Research co-chairs: Joel Campbell, Brigham Young University (e-mail) 

Before joining the Communications Department at Brigham Young University as an assistant professor, Joel Campell was a reporter and editor at the Deseret News in Salt Lake City and manager of corporate communciations at Management and Training Corp. in Centerville, Utah. He holds a master’s degree from Ohio State University and bachelor’s degree from BYU.

Campbell is active in many First Amendment and Freedom of Information causes and is past president of the National Freedom of Information Coalition and chairman of Society of Professional Journalists’ national Freedom of Information Committee. He is legislative monitor for the Utah Press Association and vice president of the Utah Headliners Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. He serves on the Utah Information Technology Commission (via Brigham Young University).

Professional, Freedom & Responsibility chair: Julia Duin, University of Memphis (e-mail)

After a year as an associate journalism professor at Union University, Julia Duin is now a graduate student at the University of Memphis earning her second MA (in journalism). Her first was in religion. She’s also been an adjunct at the University of Maryland and a contributing writer for The Washington Post. She spent the bulk of her career as a writer and reporter for five newspapers, including The Houston Chronicle and The Washington Times. She’s also written five books and is researching a sixth on 20-something pentecostal serpent handlers in Appalachia. Her latest two are “Quitting Church: Why the Faithful are Fleeing” and “Days of Fire and Glory: The Rise and Fall of a Charismatic Community.”

Newsletter editor: Greg Perreault, University of Missouri (e-mail)

Greg Perreault comes from a print journalism background and has been published in newspapers including USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, The Miami Herald and the Palm Beach Post. He holds an M.A. in Communication, Culture, Technology from Georgetown University and a B.A. in News & Information from Palm Beach Atlantic University. He has served on faculty at the Washington Journalism Center and as a newspaper advisor for Palm Beach Atlantic University. He is currently pursing a Ph.D. at the University of Missouri and continues to freelance on religion and video games for the Huffington Post.

Membership: Dan Stout, Brigham Young University-Hawaii (e-mail)

Dr. Dan Stout previously worked at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and the University of South Carolina. He is currently co-editor of the Journal of Media and Religion. He brings an impressive research publication record with him including three edited books, over two dozen book chapters and scholarly/professional articles. He is an internationally known expert on religion and the mass media.  His professional experience is in advertising at the Houston Chronicle. He holds a Ph.D. from Rutgers University, an M.A. from the University of Georgia and a B.A. from Brigham Young University (via University of Nevada-Las Vegas).

Mid-winter Conference Chair: Maccama Ikpah, Rowan University (e-mail)

Posted in Other RMIG Documents.

Encouraging the continued exploration of religion and media

Hoewe (color)By Jennifer Hoewe, Penn State University

Religion and Media Interest Group’s Top Student Paper Award Recipient, 2013

Undoubtedly, religion continues to be a persistent topic in and influence on media content. Despite its pervasiveness in media, religion has not received the type of widespread attention in media scholarship seemingly deserving of such a value-laden subject. Instead, studies on media coverage of religion or the influence of religion on media coverage take up only a fraction of the overall body of media research.

It seems part of our duty as members of – or those with an interested in – the Religion and Media Interest Group to put the intersection of religion and media in the spotlight of media research. This ambitious call, of course, requires high-quality research that presents interesting and thought-provoking research questions and hypotheses followed by thorough analyses and thoughtful conclusions. It ought to position religion, its media coverage, and its influence on media content as entities deserving of further scholarly attention. Such attention, of course, is wholly deserving.

As a student interested in the study of religion and media, I believe it’s incumbent upon my generation of researchers to recognize the potential in this area of scholarship. Not only is it an important and socially influential field of research, it has many unexplored areas. This fruitful position seems to present an ideal opportunity for burgeoning scholars: the chance to delve into an area of media research left largely unexplored. For example, one might ask how perpetual consumption of the Muslim terrorist stereotype in the media has influenced public opinion about Muslim individuals more generally. One also might ask how a substantial and growing portion of the American population – adults with no religious affiliation – feel about their portrayal in the media. Furthermore, how are these individuals depicted? These ideas aren’t overly complicated, but they offer fertile avenues ripe for academic exploration.

Practically speaking, this work also holds important implications for the non-academic population. Many religions and denominations of religions are misunderstood, particularly in their international contexts. Research examining the meaning of various religious affiliations in different regions of a country – or the world – would offer an opportunity to provide more information about how individuals define themselves. Such knowledge could aid media creators in producing more accurate religious contexts. It could then encourage a more accurately equipped media consumer.

Simply put, I hope the kind of research supported by the Religion and Media Interest Group continues to increase in number, as the intersection of religion and media appears to be a constant.

Posted in News. Tagged .

Religion and Media Paper Calls 9/10

Below you’ll find a series of calls for religion and media related papers:
______

Call for RMIG Joint Panel Proposals for the 2014 AEJMC Convention

Aloha RMIG Colleagues:

It’s not too early to think about the upcoming AEJMC Conference in Montreal, Canada on August 6-9, 2014. Due to the changes in the chip auction process, deadlines have been pushed up for the 2014 AEJMC conference. Please submit your proposal to RMIG by October 9, 2013.
Panel proposals should contain the following information:

  • Panel Title
  • Panel Type: e.g. PF&R, teaching, or research panel
  • Panel Sponsorship: Indicate which AEJMC divisions or interest groups might also be interested in co-sponsoring the panel. (Please note that while RMIG sole-sponsored panel proposals may be considered, the majority of AEJMC panels tend to be co-sponsored across divisions and interest groups to attract a higher attendance.)
  • Description of Panel: Provide a paragraph description of the key issues or subject matter to be addressed.
  • Possible Panelists: Include individuals who would be potential participants for this panel and indicate that whether you have confirmed that participation with them. It’s not necessary to have all potential panelists listed.
  • Possible Moderator
  • Contact Person:  Include your name, mailing address, e-mail address, and telephone number as the contact person for this panel proposal.

Please send proposals to both Myna Germans (mgerman@desu.edu) and Chiung Hwang Chen (chenc@byuh.edu) by October 9. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions. (Attached is the form needed to propose panels.)

Mahalo.

Chiung Hwang Chen

BYU Hawaii

RMIG Head

________

CALL FOR CHAPTER AUTHORS

Dear Colleagues,

A leading academic publisher has contracted a two-volume series entitled “The Electronic Church in the Digital Age: Cultural Impacts of Evangelical Mass Media.” As general editor, I am calling for chapter authors.

Volume 1 explores how evangelical mass media (radio, TV, online) shapes and reproduces the U.S. evangelical subculture. Volume 2 explores how evangelical mass media impact the surrounding U.S. culture and its institutions.

Some chapters for Volume 1 have been assigned, but others–including several chapters on radio, TV, and online media–need authors. These chapters investigate the role that evangelical mass media play as the subculture constructs identity, community, and the Other.

For Volume 2, we call for authors who will:

(1) research and report what evangelical broadcasters and media organizations today are actually saying about, and how they critique, a given U.S. institution;

(2) analyze these evangelical media organizations’ critiques through some recognized approach (of your choice) to media criticism; and thereby

(3) inform scholars and educated general readers not only what evangelical media are saying, but also how media criticism can aid our understanding of what is said.

Authors are needed to write chapters on how evangelical mass media critique:

the role of religion in public life
other (non-evangelical) Christians
other world religions
the role of government
economic issues
social issues
the family
education
war/defense

Both established and new scholars are welcome. Chapters are projected at about 8,000 words and not due until May or early summer. If interested in writing for Volume 1 or 2, please contact Mark Ward at wardm@uhv.edu.

Sincerely,

Mark Ward Sr, PhD
Assistant Professor of Communication
University of Houston-Victoria
School of Arts & Sciences
3007 North Ben Wilson
Victoria, Texas 77901
Phone: 361.570.4256
Email: wardm@uhv.edu

________

Call for Papers: Media, Religion and Culture in a Networked World

A Conference of the International Society for Media, Religion, and Culture

Conference Location: Canterbury, U.K.
Conference dates: August 4-8, 2014
Deadline for Paper proposals: December 3, 2013
Notification of acceptances: January 15, 2013

Over the past decade the study of media, religion and culture has broadened out from interests in media representation to thinking about the religious uses and aesthetics of media, the significance of media for religion in public life, and the role of media technologies for new forms of religious life and practice. Building on this, the conference will explore how we can understand societies in which much public encounter with religion takes place through media and in which diverse religious lives are lived through a multiplicity of mediated networks. What difference do media content, aesthetics, technologies and networks make to the ways in which religion is understood, practiced and engaged? How do we understand the nature of power in relation to these mediated networks and practices?

The conference will explore these issues from a range of disciplinary perspectives, bringing together scholars in media studies, religious studies, international studies, the anthropology and sociology of religion, history, the study of literature and public policy. This is the biennial meeting of the International Society for Media, Religion and Culture, which, since its first meeting in 1996, has become the leading international conference for the discussion of research in this field.

We are accepting paper proposals of up to 350 words; panel proposals (which must include paper titles, 150 word abstracts for each paper, and names and titles of four participants plus a moderator/respondent); and proposals for exhibitions and/or workshops of up to 350 words.  Sessions will be 1½ hours in length.  The conference will also feature as a keynote speaker Professor Jonathan Walton of Harvard, author of Watch This! The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Televangelism. Plans also include a banquet with an address from Inaugural Society President Stewart M. Hoover, and plenary panels involving well-known contributors in this area.

Some of the questions that may be addressed in paper, panel, workshop, or exhibition proposals include:

•       The role of media in shaping religious and cultural understandings
•       Emergent networks of meaning, religion, and power
•       Theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of religion and media
•       The role of religious and humanitarian organizations in cross-national justice and media initiatives
•       Media and human rights
•       Media, religion, and authority
•       Religious conflict and media representation
•       Religion and film
•       Growing up multi-cultural and multi-religious in a mediated world
•       Religion, globalization and cosmopolitanism
•       The role of media in the emergence of global religious and cultural movements
•       Diasporic media and transnational religious communities
•       Media, religion and global politics
•       The mediatization of religion
•       Religion, media, and the global marketplace

The conference will be held at the Cathedral Lodge conference centre in Canterbury in the United Kingdom. Canterbury is an attractive town with many buildings dating to the medieval period, and parts of which have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. Canterbury has good transport links to airports in the London area as well as the Eurostar train service to continental Europe.

Proposals for individual papers, panels, workshops and exhibitions should be sent to:

Lynn Schofield Clark, Professor, University of Denver, Conference Program Planner and Vice President, International Society for Media, Religion, and Culture: Lynn.Clark@du.edu.

Details about registration and housing for the conference will be uploaded on the conference webpage (link to URL), and queries may be sent to the conference convenor, Professor Gordon Lynch, University of Kent: G.Lynch@kent.ac.uk
To receive updates on the conference, like us on Facebook!

______________

Call for Papers: Console-ing Passions

April 10-12, 2014, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

Keynote speaker: Angela McRobbie, Professor of Communication, Goldsmiths, University of London

Founded by a group of feminist media scholars and artists in 1989, Console-ing Passions held its first official conference at the University of Iowa in 1992. Since that time, Console-ing Passions has become the leading international scholarly network for feminist research in television, video, audio, and new media.

The 2014 conference invites individual papers, pre-constituted panels, and workshops that consider the breadth of feminist issues on television, video, audio, and new media. We seek proposals that address the broader aims of Console-ing Passions: gender, race and ethnicity, nationality, sexuality, class, and (dis)ability.

Possible topics include:
*media production and industries
*media audiences and fans
*textual analysis and criticism
*gaming and virtual worlds
*feminist and queer theory
*neoliberalism and the economy
*transmedia and convergence culture
*music and sound studies
*transnational cultural flows
*history and theory of media
*social media and the Internet
*theories of post-television
*social movements and media activism
*religion and media
*youth culture and media

The deadline for submissions is 11:59 PM (Central) on Tuesday, October 1, 2013.

Please submit all proposals to: Console-ingPassions.org

Individual Papers: Individuals submitting paper proposals should provide an abstract of 250 words, a short bio, and contact information.

Pre-Constituted Panel Proposals: Panel coordinators should submit a 200-word rationale for the panel as whole. For each contributor, please submit a 250-word abstract, a short bio, and contact information. Panels that include a diversity of panelist affiliations and experience levels are strongly encouraged. Panels should include 3-4 papers.

Workshop Proposals: We seek workshop ideas that focus on scholarly issues in the field and matters of professionalization. Topics might include: media activism; mentoring; the job market; digital networking; workplace politics; teaching; tenure and promotion; publishing; etc. Coordinators should submit a 350-word rationale (including some discussion of why the topic lends itself to a workshop format), a short bio, and contact information. For each workshop participant, please submit a title, short bio, and contact information. Workshops are intended to encourage discussion; contributors should plan on a series of brief, informal presentations.

Screening Proposals: We invite proposals for video, audio, and new media screenings. Proposals should consist of a 350-word abstract (including the length and format of the work), a short bio of the producer/director, and contact information. If the work is viewable online, please submit a url.

Please visit our website for information about events, Console-ingPassions.org schedules, travel information, and more. Please direct all questions about the conference and the submission process to: CPMissouri2014@gmail.com

Follow us on twitter @CPMissouri2014

Conference Organizers: Melissa A. Click, Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Julie Passanante Elman, Holly Willson Holladay, Hyunji Lee, and Amanda Nell Edgar

_______

Call for Panelists: ECA

I am putting together a panel on dissent in religion, labor, and politics (and wherever else) for ECA. There is room for two more panelists. If interested, please contact me: ddewberry@rider.edu

David R. Dewberry, Ph.D.
Editor, First Amendment Studies

_____

Upcoming Conference

The Image and the Word

Forum4:15  | September 26-27, 2013 | Spring Arbor University

This conference includes both live and virtual presentations.

Forum4:15 explores the relationship between motive and message (Ephesians 4:15). The conference is hosted by the graduate program in communication at Spring Arbor University and held on the campus of the University in Spring Arbor, Michigan.  It begins Thursday evening and ends Saturday at noon.

The theme of the 2013 conference is The Image and the Word.

This year Forum4:15 features Terry Lindvall, the C.S. Lewis Chair of Communication and Christian Thought at Virginia Wesleyan College and Quentin Schultze, Arthur H. DeKruyter Chair and Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences at Calvin College.

This conference invites both virtual and live presentations and papers by faculty and students exploring all aspects of visual communication, including the tension between an image-driven postmodern culture and a “People of the Book.”

Presentations are not limited to cinema.  Discussions of still photography, comics, graphics, tattoos and other visual forms including theater are welcome, as are studies of the effects of visual communication on literacy, faith and communication.

Presentations are limited to 20 minutes and will be grouped by media or topic whenever possible. Panels will have 45 minutes.  Presentations will be conducted on the Go-To-Meeting webinar platform.  A brief training session will be required for virtual presenters.

Please contact Dr. Metts (wmetts@arbor.edu) for any information about this conference, our e-forum, or our graduate program.

Posted in Call for papers, Conferences.

Religion and Media Paper Calls 8/21/13

Below you’ll find a series of calls for religion and media related papers:

_______

I am putting together a panel on dissent in religion, labor, and politics (and wherever else) for ECA. There is room for two more panelists. If interested, please contact me: ddewberry@rider.edu

David R. Dewberry, Ph.D.
Editor, First Amendment Studies

________

Call for Papers: Media, Religion and Culture in a Networked World

A Conference of the International Society for Media, Religion, and Culture

Conference Location: Canterbury, U.K.
Conference dates: August 4-8, 2014
Deadline for Paper proposals: December 3, 2013
Notification of acceptances: January 15, 2013

Over the past decade the study of media, religion and culture has broadened out from interests in media representation to thinking about the religious uses and aesthetics of media, the significance of media for religion in public life, and the role of media technologies for new forms of religious life and practice. Building on this, the conference will explore how we can understand societies in which much public encounter with religion takes place through media and in which diverse religious lives are lived through a multiplicity of mediated networks. What difference do media content, aesthetics, technologies and networks make to the ways in which religion is understood, practiced and engaged? How do we understand the nature of power in relation to these mediated networks and practices?

The conference will explore these issues from a range of disciplinary perspectives, bringing together scholars in media studies, religious studies, international studies, the anthropology and sociology of religion, history, the study of literature and public policy. This is the biennial meeting of the International Society for Media, Religion and Culture, which, since its first meeting in 1996, has become the leading international conference for the discussion of research in this field.

We are accepting paper proposals of up to 350 words; panel proposals (which must include paper titles, 150 word abstracts for each paper, and names and titles of four participants plus a moderator/respondent); and proposals for exhibitions and/or workshops of up to 350 words.  Sessions will be 1½ hours in length.  The conference will also feature as a keynote speaker Professor Jonathan Walton of Harvard, author of Watch This! The Ethics and Aesthetics of Black Televangelism. Plans also include a banquet with an address from Inaugural Society President Stewart M. Hoover, and plenary panels involving well-known contributors in this area.

Some of the questions that may be addressed in paper, panel, workshop, or exhibition proposals include:

•       The role of media in shaping religious and cultural understandings
•       Emergent networks of meaning, religion, and power
•       Theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of religion and media
•       The role of religious and humanitarian organizations in cross-national justice and media initiatives
•       Media and human rights
•       Media, religion, and authority
•       Religious conflict and media representation
•       Religion and film
•       Growing up multi-cultural and multi-religious in a mediated world
•       Religion, globalization and cosmopolitanism
•       The role of media in the emergence of global religious and cultural movements
•       Diasporic media and transnational religious communities
•       Media, religion and global politics
•       The mediatization of religion
•       Religion, media, and the global marketplace

The conference will be held at the Cathedral Lodge conference centre in Canterbury in the United Kingdom. Canterbury is an attractive town with many buildings dating to the medieval period, and parts of which have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. Canterbury has good transport links to airports in the London area as well as the Eurostar train service to continental Europe.

Proposals for individual papers, panels, workshops and exhibitions should be sent to:

Lynn Schofield Clark, Professor, University of Denver, Conference Program Planner and Vice President, International Society for Media, Religion, and Culture: Lynn.Clark@du.edu.

Details about registration and housing for the conference will be uploaded on the conference webpage (link to URL), and queries may be sent to the conference convenor, Professor Gordon Lynch, University of Kent: G.Lynch@kent.ac.uk
To receive updates on the conference, like us on Facebook!

______________

April 10-12, 2014, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

Keynote speaker: Angela McRobbie, Professor of Communication, Goldsmiths, University of London

Founded by a group of feminist media scholars and artists in 1989, Console-ing Passions held its first official conference at the University of Iowa in 1992. Since that time, Console-ing Passions has become the leading international scholarly network for feminist research in television, video, audio, and new media.

The 2014 conference invites individual papers, pre-constituted panels, and workshops that consider the breadth of feminist issues on television, video, audio, and new media. We seek proposals that address the broader aims of Console-ing Passions: gender, race and ethnicity, nationality, sexuality, class, and (dis)ability.

Possible topics include:
*media production and industries
*media audiences and fans
*textual analysis and criticism
*gaming and virtual worlds
*feminist and queer theory
*neoliberalism and the economy
*transmedia and convergence culture
*music and sound studies
*transnational cultural flows
*history and theory of media
*social media and the Internet
*theories of post-television
*social movements and media activism
*religion and media
*youth culture and media

The deadline for submissions is 11:59 PM (Central) on Tuesday, October 1, 2013.

Please submit all proposals to: Console-ingPassions.org

Individual Papers: Individuals submitting paper proposals should provide an abstract of 250 words, a short bio, and contact information.

Pre-Constituted Panel Proposals: Panel coordinators should submit a 200-word rationale for the panel as whole. For each contributor, please submit a 250-word abstract, a short bio, and contact information. Panels that include a diversity of panelist affiliations and experience levels are strongly encouraged. Panels should include 3-4 papers.

Workshop Proposals: We seek workshop ideas that focus on scholarly issues in the field and matters of professionalization. Topics might include: media activism; mentoring; the job market; digital networking; workplace politics; teaching; tenure and promotion; publishing; etc. Coordinators should submit a 350-word rationale (including some discussion of why the topic lends itself to a workshop format), a short bio, and contact information. For each workshop participant, please submit a title, short bio, and contact information. Workshops are intended to encourage discussion; contributors should plan on a series of brief, informal presentations.

Screening Proposals: We invite proposals for video, audio, and new media screenings. Proposals should consist of a 350-word abstract (including the length and format of the work), a short bio of the producer/director, and contact information. If the work is viewable online, please submit a url.

Please visit our website for information about events, Console-ingPassions.org schedules, travel information, and more. Please direct all questions about the conference and the submission process to: CPMissouri2014@gmail.com

Follow us on twitter @CPMissouri2014

Conference Organizers: Melissa A. Click, Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Julie Passanante Elman, Holly Willson Holladay, Hyunji Lee, and Amanda Nell Edgar

Posted in Call for papers, Conferences.

2013 Spring Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS: Spring 2013

Welcome to the spring 2013 newsletter from the Religion and Media Interest Group! Inside you’ll find information about a religion and media group to follow.

Table of Contents

  1. The Network for New Media, Religion and Digital Culture Studies
  2. REMINDER: RMIG to co-sponsor panels at upcoming AEJMC conference
  3. Upcoming calls for papers and conferences

For these articles, keep reading after the jump.

Read More »

Posted in Newsletters.

2013 Winter Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS: Winter 2013

Here’s your winter 2013 newsletter from RMIG! Read about new publications, find out about upcoming events and meet some of our officers.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Co-sponsored panels at the AEJMC conference in Washington, D.C. — Aug. 8-11, 2013
  2. New publication: “Evangelical Christians and Popular Culture: Pop Goes the Gospel”
  3. Journalism and faith conference in Jakarta, Indonesia — November 5-7, 2013
  4. Religion and Media Conference at Elon University — April 12-13, 2013
  5. Meet our new Research Co-Chair, Myna German
  6. A note about the Media Diversity Forum

For these articles, keep reading after the jump.

Read More »

Posted in News, Newsletters. Tagged , , , , , , .

A note from the Chair

By David Scott, Utah Valley University 

As the new Chair of the Religion and Media Interest Group of AEJMC, I would like to offer a hearty welcome to all newcomers and a note to all our members about the value and contributions we can all offer to AEJMC and the academic world as members of this interest group.

The last few years have been especially good for scholars interested in the interplay of religion and media given the run-up to an election year in the United States when religion became a significant component of the discourse about the candidates and U.S. politics. Furthermore, world events across the Middle East and the rise of laws in the European Union that discriminated against Islam in the name of “protecting women’s rights” in recent years gives rise to a need for even more outreach and study of religion, culture, and media in the modern world.

Last summer, we had a particularly good AEJMC meeting in which we were engaged in scholarship that was broad in the scope of religious traditions. Not only that, but we were also had research and panels co-sponsored with other units of AEJMC to extend our influence and knowledge across disciplinary boundaries.

This upcoming year offers another opportunity to grow as a unit and reach out to others in joint academic adventures. I would like to encourage ALL members to reach out to our colleagues in other units and encourage those with similar interests or research agendas to consider joining RMIG if they have not already done so. Finally, I would like to ask all of our members to seriously consider sending their research for the 2013 conference. As our mission statement says, we are: dedicated to the exploration of the intersection of media and religion in our world. We encourage scholarly analysis (both quantitative and qualitative) of this intersection in three areas: (1) religion portrayed in secular media; (2) the manner in which religious institutions and organizations use the media to propagate their message; and (3) the impact of religion and/or religiosity of media consumers and its impact on their media use. I would like to encourage members not only to consider scholarship that addresses a broad range of religious traditions, but also to help us move into the twenty-first century by considering non-traditional media venues as well as social media and the Internet in considering proposals and research for 2013.

David W. Scott, Ph.D.

Chair, RMIG

scottdw@uvu

Posted in Newsletters.

RMIG Paper call

This is the 2013 RMIG Call for Papers

Posted in Call for papers, Conferences. Tagged , .

Summer 2012 Newsletter

Summer 2012 RMIG Newsletter

The academic year flew by so quickly we didn’t get a newsletter out to you! So here’s a packed newsletter with details of RMIG programming at the AEJMC Conference, a call for papers, and many more details of interest. We hope to see many of you soon in Chicago for AEJMC’s Annual Conference. There’s much, much more after the jump.

Read More »

Posted in Newsletters. Tagged , , , .

2011-2012 Annual Report

Click here to download RMIG’s 2011-2012 Annual Report.

Posted in Other RMIG Documents. Tagged .

Long-time religion specialist elected chair

Cecile S. Holmes, who had a distinguished career as a religion editor for the Houston Chronicle and who is now on the University of South Carolina faculty, was elected RMIG chair for the 2011-2012 year. David Scott, at Utah Valley University, was elected vice-chair. Together, Holmes and Scott will represent RMIG at the December chip auction, when divisions and interest groups collaborate to create the Annual Conference schedule. RMIG thanks Holmes and Scott for their service to RMIG. They can be reached via their contact information on the officers’ page.

Posted in News.

2011 Summer Newsletter

Varied opportunities abound at AEJMC summer convention

By Anthony Hatcher, Elon
RMIG Chair

Here’s hoping you have your plans set for AEJMC in St. Louis. Here are a few random notes concerning the upcoming conference. Two highlights inside the hotel:

  • Linda Steiner of Maryland will be installed as 2011-12 AEJMC president. Kyu Ho Youm of Oregon will become president-elect.
  • This year’s keynote speech will be delivered by the Chief Innovation Officer of Chicago-based Publicis Groupe Media. Rishad Tobaccowala started the interactive marketing agency within Publicis in 1993, making him a pioneer of Internet advertising.

Keep reading past the jump for more on this summer’s AEJMC convention and even more from this summer’s newsletter.

Read More »

Posted in Newsletters.

2011 Religion and Media Interest Group – Renewal Petition

Below is a link to the Religion and Media Interest Group Renewal Petition submitted by Anthony Hatcher, the 2010-2011 RMIG Chair.

Religion and Media Interest Group – Renewal Petition

Posted in Other RMIG Documents.

2011 Winter Newsletter

Meet me in St. Louis

By Anthony Hatcher, Elon
RIMG Chair

It’s about as cliché a headline as you can write, but in this case it’s also an invitation to get ready to do just that. AEJMC will hold its annual conference in the city from Aug. 10–13, and headquarters will be at the Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel.

The rates are $170 for single or double occupancy, and $200 for triple or quad rooms. Internet access is included with the room.

As you know, the research paper deadline is April 1, so it’s not too early to book those flights, reserve those rooms, and start thinking about what to do in the city when you’re not attending every single session RMIG has to offer. View our paper call and paper calls from all of the various divisions and groups.

Some food and attraction suggestions: If you like jazz and blues with your dinner, try BB’s Jazz, Blues, and Soups. If ragtime is more to your taste, try the Scott Joplin House State Historic SiteCaleco’s Bar & Grill has 17 TV screens and two saltwater aquariums, as well as steaks, chicken, seafood, pizza, and many, many drinks.

Under the category of Must-Do stuff, you have to start with the Gateway Arch. When you descend from the Arch, you can relax by touring one of the country’s largest breweries.

Read more from this winter’s RMIG newsletter after the jump.

Read More »

Posted in Newsletters.

2011 RMIG programming

Here is a sketch of Religion and Media Interest Group programming during the the AEJMC 2011 Convention in St. Louis. More details to come.

Wednesday

  • 1:30-3 p.m.: Panel with ESIG
  • 3:15-4:45 p.m.: Panel with GLBT
  • 5-6:30 p.m.: Panel with Council of Affiliates

Thursday

  • 8:15-9:45 a.m.: Panel with History
  • 5-6:30 p.m.: Refereed Paper Session
  • 6:45-8:15 p.m.: Members’ Meeting

Friday

  • 12:15-1:30 p.m.: Scholar-to-Scholar Session
  • 3:30-5 p.m.: Panel with Mass Communication & Society
Posted in Conferences, News.

Elon’s Anthony Hatcher elected chair

Anthony Hatcher, Elon

Members attending the RMIG business meeting in Denver last month elected Anthony Hatcher of Elon University the new chair of the Religion and Media Interest Group. Cecile S. Holmes of University of South Carolina was elected vice chair. See this site for a complete list of new officers.

Cecile S. Holmes, South Carolina

RMIG thanks Paola Banchero from the University of Alaska-Anchorage for her service as chair this year. Paola was responsible for submitting the application to AEJMC requesting that RMIG be renewed as an Interest Group. That request was approved.

Posted in News.

2010 Summer Newsletter

Toronto, Turkey and Beyond?

Conference Considers Forming International Society of Media, Religion and Culture

John P. Ferré, University of Louisville
RMIG member

The Seventh International Conference on Media, Religion, and Culture, meeting from August 9 to 13 at Ryerson University in Toronto ended with agreement to vote on the formation of an International Society of Media, Religion, and Culture (ISMRC) by June 2012, when the group will convene again in northwest Turkey on the campus of Anadolu University. ISMRC will be the first worldwide association dedicated to the academic study of media, religion and culture.

In many ways, the conference in Toronto was typical of the six international conferences on media, religion, and culture that preceded it. The conferees came from several continents — North America and Europe especially, but also Australia, Asia, Africa, and South America. The host country has always been well represented, so Canadians had a strong presence at this year’s meeting.

The conferees also came from several disciplines. Besides media studies and religious studies, participants in Toronto came from sociology, theology, English, history, and political science. Most of their papers were qualitative, but some quantitative research was presented as well.

Keep reading past the jump for more on the International Conference on Media, Religion, and Culture.

Read More »

Posted in Newsletters.

2010 Winter Newsletter

Rocky Mountain High: AEJMC Annual Convention set for Denver

By Paola Banchero, University of Alaska Anchorage
Religion and Media Interest Group head

From my vantage point overlooking snow-frosted birch trees, summer sounds a long way off. But it’s not too soon to start thinking about the AEJMC annual convention in Denver Aug. 4-7.

The Mile High City is a great place to be in August. Actually, it’s a great place to be anytime. I’m biased. I grew up in Denver and take every chance I can to visit family who live there. So let me tell you a little about the city. First off, Denver is the capital of a state that just crossed the five million mark in terms of population. Like a lot of Western cities, it’s seen a lot of growth. It started as a camp for miners who had struck gold at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, and used to have a reputation as a cow town with little nightlife. Boy, that’s changed. Now it’s nearly a continuous urban area, ranging from north of the city to Fort Collins and south of the city to Pueblo. And the city boasts one of the best music scenes with venues like the Bluebird Theater at 3317 E. Colfax Ave. A retro neon sign adorns the establishment, and it’s located on a street that embraces yuppies, recent immigrants and the occasional drug user.

The conference hotel is the Sheraton Downtown Denver Hotel at 1550 Court Place. Good restaurants and public transit are nearby. If you’re interested in staying at a boutique hotel, you might try the Hotel Monaco. It’s stylish and features one of the best restaurants in the city, Panzano. The restaurant was named a “Top 5” by the now-defunct Rocky Mountain News and given four stars by 5280 Magazine, one of Denver’s city magazines. The luxurious Hotel Teatro is also close by. The historic Brown Palace is the place to have afternoon tea, as the elites visiting Denver have done for decades.

For more of Paola’s take on Denver and the conference, keep reading after the jump.

Read More »

Posted in Newsletters.

2009 Fall Newsletter

November 13, 2009

Table of Contents

Mid-Winter conference set for Oklahoma
Member subscription to journal put on hold
Teaching Tips: The Graduate Student Web Site Mini-Project
Topical research key to RMIG identity

Keep reading past the jump for more from this fall’s newsletter and from Baylor’s Amanda Sturgill.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2009 Winter Newsletter

January 30, 2009

Table of Contents
From the Chair: Salutations and Updates
How Much do we reveal?
Mid-Winter meeting
Students in China

Keep reading past the jump for more from this winter’s newsletter and from RMIG Chair Jim Trammell.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2009 Spring Newsletter

FROM THE CHAIR

Religion and Politics: A Combustible Mix

Before being picked to deliver the invocation at the 2009 Presidential Inauguration, Rick Warren had a relatively positive public persona.  He was best known for founding Orange County, California’s Saddleback Church, and for the success of his book, The Purpose-Drive Life. He was also lauded for promoting broad social justice issues that do not tend to align with the priorities of his evangelical peers.  Even though evangelicals like Warren tend to support Republican candidates, Warren broke from their ranks by hosting the Democratic candidate at Saddleback for a Q-and-A. Noting his broad appeal, Time called Warren “America’s Preacher.”

For more from RMIG Chair Jim Trammell, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2008 Winter Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS

Winter 2008
Welcome to the newsletter of the Religion and Media Interest Group of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication!

Articles

  1. Editor’s Introduction
  2. Presidents and Poker: Reflections from the RMIG Head
  3. Religion and Media Research Reflections
  4. Online: The Next Frontier of Religion News Coverage
  5. Virtues of a Student/Teacher Contract
  6. Resources

For these articles and more from editor Jim Trammell, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2007 Fall Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS

Fall 2007
Welcome to the newsletter of the Religion and Media Interest Group of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication!

Articles

  1. Editor’s Introduction
  2. The Chair’s Corner
  3. Want your students to get religion? Show it. Don’t Just Tell It.
  4. New RMIG Officers Elected
  5. Submissions sought for Mid-Winter Meeting
  6. Resources

For these articles and more from editor Crystal Y. Lumpkins, keep reading past the jump.

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2007 Summer Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS

Summer 2007

Welcome to the newsletter of the Religion and Media Interest Group, part of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication!

  1. Co-editor’s Introduction
  2. An RMIG Progress Report
  3. On Fallwell
  4. Teaching Religious Literacy to Journalism Students
  5. AEJMC Convention Information

For these articles and more from co-editor Jim Trammell, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2006 Summer Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS

Summer 2006
Welcome to the newsletter of the Religion and Media Interest Group of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication!

Articles

  1. Editor’s Column
  2. The Chair’s Corner
  3. Panels Present Special Topics of Interest
  4. RMIG Acknowledgements and Applause
  5. Connecting with the Religion News Reader
  6. RMIG Needs Your Help
  7. Reviewers wanted

For these articles and more from editor Crystal Y. Lumpkins, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2006 Winter Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS

Winter 2006
Welcome to the newsletter of the Religion and Media Interest Group of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication!

Articles

  1. Editor’s Introduction
  2. The Chair’s Corner
  3. Research Topics Involving Hurricane Katrina
  4. News Content and the Religion Debate
  5. Hurricane Katrina and the Media: What went wrong?
  6. Acknowledgement and Applause
  7. Opportunities
  8. Dates to Remember

For these articles and more from editor Crystal Y. Lumpkins, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2005 Spring Newsletter

Articles

  1. Editor’s Introduction
  2. Covering Multiculturalism/Covering Religion
  3. A Note from the Research Chair
  4. AEJMC Convention-RMIG Call for Paper
  5. AEJMC Convention-RMIG Schedule
  6. Asbury Student Wins $500 Student Religion Writing Contest
  7. Media, Religion and Culture Dissertation Fellowships

For these articles and more from editor Jim Trammell, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2004 Summer Newsletter

Articles

  1. Chair’s comments
  2. 2004 RMIG program for Annual Conference
  3. Communication and Faith Conference Planned
  4. RMIG Call for Papers
  5. SMIG invites GIFT submissions
  6. RMIG member news
  7. Resources in Religion and Media
  8. Reviewers needed

Perspectives

For these articles and essays, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2004 Winter Newsletter

Articles

  1. Editor’s Introduction
  2. Getting it Right? Religion, Media and Politics
  3. Call for papers: AEJMC Convention, Aug. 10-13, 2005
  4. Call for contributors: Encyclopedia of Religion, Communication, and Media
  5. Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships in Media, Religion, and Culture at the University of Colorado’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication

For these articles and more from editor Jim Trammell, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2003 Fall Newsletter

Articles

  1. Creating Our Own (Not so Urban) Legend
  2. Great Minds Do Think Alike: Panel Ideas Mirror Trends
  3. Call for papers
  4. Call for reviewers
  5. RMIG Listserv revived
  6. Christian Media Come of Age
  7. RMIG Member News and Views
  8. Staffing of Specialists at Newsmagazines Falls to New Low

For these articles, keep reading past the jump.

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2003 Summer Newsletter

RELIGION MATTERS

Summer 2003

Welcome to this special teaching edition of Religion Matters!

  1. From the Head…a good year for RMIG, and it’s only getting better
  2. Call from in-coming head for new leadership
  3. Kansas City RMIG Research Paper Schedule
  4. Emphasis on Teaching: A Call for syllabi, teaching ideas
  5. Emphasis on Teaching: Making Religion and Media courses fun but not fluff is trick to success
  6. Emphasis on Teaching: First Amendment is natural for religion and media courses
  7. Diane Winston named Knight Chair in Media and Religion at USC Annenberg
  8. Call for papers
  9. Bibliography

For these articles and more from RMIG Chair Debra Mason, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2003 Spring Newsletter

Contents

  1. New online newsletter signals changes afoot at RMIG
  2. RMIG Kansas City program forges new partnerships
  3. AEJMC committee reports review RMIG activities
  4. Researchers should turn focus to religion and media discourse
  5. Secular Politics on the Israeli World Wide Web
  6. Faith and Doubt at Ground Zero

For these articles and more from RMIG Chair Debra Mason, keep reading past the jump.

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Posted in Newsletters.

2000-2002 Newsletters (PDFs)

Help the Religion and Media Interest Group complete its collection of archived newsletters. If you have a newsletter not listed here, please scan it and e-mail it to Debra Mason. E-mail Debra if you prefer to mail or fax the newsletter.

These documents are downloadable in PDF form.

Posted in Newsletters.